East Looe rock pools

Winter Solstice Rock Pooling

It’s the shortest day of the year, but there’s no shortage of colour and life in the rock pools here in Looe.

I try out a pool I’ve not explored before and am blown away by the variety of animals going about their day, searching for food and shelter.

Easily my favourite find of the day is this European three-spot cowrie. Although they’re not uncommon here on the south-east coast of Cornwall, at low tide they’re usually retracted in their shellsΒ  or abseiling from the rocks on a mucous thread.

To find one fully extended out of its shell, its orange syphon probing the weeds and its leopard-print mantle curled around its shell, is fabulous. I’ve always loved finding these shells washed up on the beach, but the live animal is incredibly colourful. It looks far too tropical for our cold waters.

European three-spot cowrie looking glamorous
European three-spot cowrie looking glamorous
European three-spot cowrie
European three-spot cowrie

It’s not a great low tide but this large, shallow pool is ideal for all sorts of creatures.

Painted top shells are plentiful in this pool - there must be lots of food for them.
Painted top shells are plentiful in this pool – there must be lots of food for them.
Like the cowrie, this thick-lipped dog whelk has a long syphon.
Like the cowrie, this thick-lipped dog whelk has a long syphon.
A Velvet swimming crab lurking under an overhang
A Velvet swimming crab lurking under an overhang
These hydroids and bryozoans have their feeding tentacles out
These hydroids and bryozoans have their feeding tentacles out
A stalked jellyfish - Calvadosia cruxmelitensis
A stalked jellyfish – Calvadosia cruxmelitensis
Worm pipefish
Worm pipefish
A young snakelocks anemone
A young snakelocks anemone

Everywhere I look, there are more animals going about their business. Hermit crabs scurry past me and a fish takes shelter under my welly.

From now on, the days will get longer, and before long the sea slugs and fish will begin to move in to the shore to spawn. It seems some can’t wait for spring – even today I find a pair of Berthella plumula sea slugs under a stone!

If you’re in Cornwall this Christmas, take a look at the rock pools. You won’t be disappointed.

Nadelik Lowen!

Berthella plumula sea slug - I find two under a rock so it looks like they're planning to spawn soon.
Berthella plumula sea slug – I find two under a rock so it looks like they’re planning to spawn soon.
Who needs a Christmas tree when you can just decorate yourself in seaweed? 'Decorator' spider crab - Macropodia sp.
Who needs a Christmas tree when you can just decorate yourself in seaweed? ‘Decorator’ spider crab – Macropodia sp.

 

 

 

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10 thoughts on “Winter Solstice Rock Pooling”

  1. So lovely! A few of us who swim in the sea through the year in Pz and West Cornwall were wondering if we could entice you out on one of swims? ..We often find new creatures in the sea or the backgrounds of our photos and don’t know what they are..prompting searches through textbooks..

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Jackie, That sounds fabulous. I love swimming in the sea, although I don’t cope well with the cold so it might have to be summer/autumn! Also if you have any photos you want help with you can drop me a line through my contact page so I can give you an email to send photos to… or message them to my Facebook. I’ll look forward to hearing more and hopefully meeting you for a swim before too long. Yay! Heather

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