Summer Holiday Rock Pooling Events in Cornwall – The Full List

Here it is… the 2017 list of summer rockpooling events in Cornwall during the holidays. It’s the best ever, with events to suit all the family!

Take a look below to see what’s on near you. There’s no better way to make the most of your rock pooling than to join the experts to find amazing marine creatures and learn all about them.

All you need are: some sturdy rockpooling shoes like wellies, neoprene beach shoes or wetsuit boot (not flip flops or crocs); a bucket, and sun protection.

Please check the organiser’s page carefully for the exact details and any alterations. You will need to book in advance for some of these events.

 Happy rockpooling! Maybe see you there?

FRIDAY 28TH JULY, 14.00-16.00, St Michael’s Mount. Rockpool Explorer with the National Trust https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/events/795f56c8-54f5-4205-acde-482402421940/pages/details

SUNDAY 6TH AUGUST, 10.00 – 12.00, St Michael’s Mount. Rockpool Explorer with the National Trust (Scroll to the bottom of the following web page for this date) https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/events/795f56c8-54f5-4205-acde-482402421940/pages/details

MONDAY 7TH AUGUST, 12.00 – 13.30, Northcott, Bude. Hurray for Honeycomb with Cornwall Wildlife Trust. Meet at Northcott Mouth National Trust car park, Bude http://www.cornwallwildlifetrust.org.uk/events/2017/01/06/hurray-honeycomb?instance=0

TUESDAY 8TH AUGUST, 11.30 – 13.30. Polzeath. Rockpool Ramble with Polzeath Marine Conservation Group and the National Trust, BOOKING ESSENTIAL https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/events/4d6bf7a6-558b-4e53-b1c1-3929cec9591e/pages/details

WEDNESDAY 9TH AUGUST, 11.00 – 13.00. Mousehole. St Piran’s Crab Search with Cornwall Wildlife Trust, Mousehole (Meet in Car Park, The Parade, by The Rock Pool Café) http://www.cornwallwildlifetrust.org.uk/events/2017/01/06/st-pirans-crab-search?instance=0

THURSDAY 10TH AUGUST, 13.00 – 15.00. Falmouth Harbour. Horrible Beasts Up the Creek. With Cornwall Wildlife Trust. BOOKING ESSENTIAL – Falmouth – location provided on booking. http://www.cornwallwildlifetrust.org.uk/events/2017/01/06/horrible-beasts-creek?instance=0

THURSDAY 10TH AUGUST, 13.00 – 15.00 Lantivet Bay. Rockpooling with the National Trust. Free no booking required https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/events/0916c2da-8026-4e5e-a507-5d6c413e46a0/pages/details

FRIDAY 11TH AUGUST, 13.00 – 15.00. Marazion. Strandline Scramble – looking for creatures washed up by the tide. With Cornwall Wildlife Trust. BOOKING ESSENTIAL http://www.cornwallwildlifetrust.org.uk/events/2017/01/06/strandline-scramble?instance=0

FRIDAY 11TH AUGUST, 14.00-16.00. St Michael’s Mount Causeway. Rockpool Explorer with the National Trust. (Scroll to the bottom of the following web page for this date) https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/events/795f56c8-54f5-4205-acde-482402421940/pages/details

SATURDAY 12TH AUGUST, 14.30 – 16.00. Hannafore, Looe. Rock Pool Ramble with Looe Marine Conservation Group http://www.cornwallwildlifetrust.org.uk/events/2016/12/23/summer-holiday-rockpool-ramble?instance=0

MONDAY 14TH AUGUST, 15.00 – 17.00 Polzeath, Rock Pooling and Beach Games with Wild Thymes. BOOKING ESSENTIAL http://www.cornwallwildlifetrust.org.uk/events/2017/01/26/rock-pooling-and-beach-fun-wild-thymes?instance=0

SATURDAY 19TH AUGUST, 21.30 – 23.30. Durgan. Night Time Rock Pooling with Cornwall Wildlife Trust. BOOKING ESSENTIAL – No children under 12. http://www.cornwallwildlifetrust.org.uk/events/2017/01/06/night-rockpooling?instance=0

SUNDAY 20TH AUGUST, 10.00-12.00. St Michael’s Mount Causeway. Rockpool Explorer with the National Trust. (Scroll to the bottom of the following web page for this date) https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/events/795f56c8-54f5-4205-acde-482402421940/pages/details

MONDAY 21ST AUGUST, 11.00-13.00. Polzeath. Rockpool Ramble with Polzeath Marine Conservation Group and National Trust. BOOKING ESSENTIAL (Scroll to the bottom of the page for this date) https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/events/4d6bf7a6-558b-4e53-b1c1-3929cec9591e/pages/details

TUESDAY 22ND AUGUST, 11.00 – 13.00. Polzeath. Radical Rockpooling with the Cornwall Wildlife Trust and the Polzeath Marine Conservation Group. BOOKING ESSENTIAL – Children over 11 only. http://www.cornwallwildlifetrust.org.uk/events/2017/01/26/radical-rock-pooling?instance=0

WEDNESDAY 23RD AUGUST, 11.00 – 13.00. Hannafore, Looe. Rockpool Safari Time with Fox Club, Junior branch of Cornwall Wildlife Trust. BOOKING ESSENTIAL http://www.cornwallwildlifetrust.org.uk/events/2017/01/05/rockpool-safari-time?instance=0

WEDNESDAY 23RD AUGUST, 12.30 – 14.30. Camel (Location available on booking). Rockpool Ramble with Fox Club, Junior branch of Cornwall Wildlife Trust. BOOKING ESSENTIAL http://www.cornwallwildlifetrust.org.uk/events/2017/04/20/rockpool-ramble?instance=0

THURSDAY 24TH AUGUST, 13.00 – 15.00. Polzeath. Rock Pool Ramble with Polzeath Marine Conservation Group BOOKING ESSENTIAL  http://www.cornwallwildlifetrust.org.uk/events/2017/01/26/rock-pool-ramble?instance=4

FRIDAY 25TH AUGUST, 14.00-16.00. St Michael’s Mount Causeway. Rockpool Explorer with the National Trust. (Scroll to the bottom of the following web page for this date) https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/events/795f56c8-54f5-4205-acde-482402421940/pages/details

Can’t see your event? Please let me know of any additions or alterations to this list and I’ll be delighted to share them.

Wrasse and wrack

The Cornish summers are anything but predictable. One day I’m sweltering in shorts and beach shoes and the next I’m shivering in waders and a thick jumper. Although the showers are back with a vengeance, there’s always something to be found if I can make it across the rocks without breaking an ankle.

Painted top shell, East Looe
Painted top shell, East Looe

My first outing is to the rocks beyond East Looe beach and I’m pleased to come across a new colony of St Piran’s hermit crabs on the mid-shore.

A St Piran's hermit crab starting to emerge from its shell.
A St Piran’s hermit crab starting to emerge from its shell.

They’re becoming a familiar sight around Cornwall and I’m starting to recognise them from the tips of their red legs, before their chequerboard eyes and equal-sized claws emerge from their shells.

St Piran's hermit crab showing its distinctive red legs and chequerboard eyes
A St Piran’s hermit crab showing its distinctive red legs and chequerboard eyes
This hairy crab was also out an about enjoying the showers.
This hairy crab is also out and about enjoying the showers.

Dragging the family with me on my next expedition, I take a look at the other side of Looe.

Junior and Other-Half exploring Hannafore in the rain
Junior and Other-Half exploring Hannafore in the rain

At Hannafore, the rocks are hidden under a thick brown  tangle of wracks, sargassum weed, and kelp making my feet slither with every step. It’s hard to make out where the pools are much of the time, let alone what’s in them.

Low tide at Hannafore, West Looe
Low tide at Hannafore, West Looe

Still, with some patience and careful sweeping aside of the long strands of weed, some treasures are revealed. This heart-shaped daisy anemone is the pinkest one I’ve ever seen.

An unusually pink daisy anemone
An unusually pink daisy anemone

As we wade in a long, deep pool a large fish passes between the fronds of sargassum near my feet. Moving slowly, I herd it towards a shallow corner, and, holding a bucket behind it take one more step. Nine times out of ten, I fail and the fish darts away never to be seen again. This time, the colourful fish takes me by surprise and swims straight into the bucket.

Junior getting to know our wrasse-friend
Junior getting to know our wrasse-friend

Here it is – is the first adult corkwing wrasse I’ve found in a rock pool.

Male corkwing wrasse have beautiful markings - they look almost tropical
Male corkwing wrasse have beautiful markings – they look almost tropical

Cornish Rock Pools junior comes over to admire the fish, talks to it and gives it a stroke. We look at its pouting lips and the iridescent blue stripes on its cheek, the typical colouring of the male corkwing wrasse. The female is much more dowdy.

After a few minutes, Junior lowers the bucket into the drizzle-spattered pool and we watch the wrasse swim free among the weeds.

I can see why most people see rockpooling as a fair-weather activity, but I’ve always liked the heavy calm of an empty beach on a foggy, damp day, and the animals are as colourful as ever.

Happy rockpooling!

Dahlia anemone, Hannafore
Dahlia anemone, Hannafore

My First Fox Club Expedition To Porth Mear

It’s the middle of the night and I’m convinced there’s something wrong with my eyes. I’ve unplugged my phone, tried blinking several times but I’m still seeing flickering lights and flashes. Finally I twig what’s going on and open the curtains to reveal incessant sheet lightning.

My first thought is that it had better stop by the morning, else no-one will turn up to my first rock pooling event at Porth Mear with Fox Club, the junior branch of the Cornwall Wildlife Trust. As a child, I was a keen member myself so I’ve been looking forward to this for months.

By the morning the lightning storm has given way to wind and rain, but conditions are less than inspiring. It’s amazing anyone shows up for rock pooling, but a few hardy well-wrapped-up folk do, as does a lovely volunteer assistant. In the chill wind at Pentire Farm car park my faith in the weather wavers, but we’re here now. There’s nothing for it but to grab the buckets and set out.

As soon as I see the bay, I know it’s going to be fine. The cliffs are sheltering the pools and the waves are dashing themselves out against the rocks on the western side of the cove. The cloud thins, the temperature lifts. It’s a perfect day for rockpooling.

Within minutes of hitting the pools, a little girl brings over the first sea hare. We watch it unfolding its long ‘ears’ in the tub and she’s delighted with it, announcing it to be far nicer than garden slugs.

Sea hares (Aplysia punctata) graze on seaweeds and have antennae on their heads that look like big ears.
Sea hares (Aplysia punctata) graze on seaweeds and have antennae on their heads that look like big ears.

She’s barely returned to the pool before she’s back again with a gorgeous baby spiny starfish on some kelp. When I turn the seaweed over I realise she’s also brought me an even tinier baby cushion star. The kids squeal at its cuteness. It’s going to be a magical day!

A Xantho pilipes crab. These crabs have hairy back legs and vary a lot in colour. They often curl up like pebbles when you pick them up.
A Xantho pilipes crab. These crabs have hairy back legs and vary in colour. They often curl up like pebbles when you pick them up.

The finds flood in. There are Green shore crabs, Xantho pilipes (hairy-legged ‘pebble’ crabs), including some females with eggs tucked under their tails. There are hermit crabs, brittle stars and lots more sea hares. The seaweed-packed pools are providing the perfect conditions  for sea hares to get fat and start spawning.

Sure enough, we find the pink spaghetti eggs of the sea hare in a pool.

Sea hares lay egg-strings that look like pink spaghetti.
Sea hares lay egg-strings that look like pink spaghetti.

Even more excitingly, when one of the mums rescues a sea hare that is stranded on a rock, drying out fast, it assumes it’s being attacked and squirts out purple ink. We gather round to watch the jet of ink in the tub which soon turns the water purple.

Sea hare on the defensive squirting out purple ink to confuse predators.
Sea hare on the defensive, squirting out purple ink to confuse predators.

We’re all looking out for the St Piran’s hermit crab (Clibanarius erythropus) and sure enough we find several large colonies of them. They first re-arrived here last year after an absence of around 40 years.

St Piran's hermit crab at Porth Mear
St Piran’s hermit crab at Porth Mear

There are plenty of the common hermit crabs (Pagurus bernhardus) too. The species are easy to tell apart, as the common hermit has yellow eyes and a right claw much bigger than the left, whereas the St Piran’s crab has black and white eyes, equal sized claws and red, hairy legs.

I keep asking if they’ve had enough, given that it’s past lunch time, but they’re keen to carry on. I’m impressed by how knowledgeable everyone is already and how good they all are at taking care of the animals they find. There might well be some future marine biologists in this group.

Light bulb sea squirts at Porth Mear
Light bulb sea squirts at Porth Mear

The finds keep flooding in. There’s a smart little Aeolidia papillosa ‘sheep’ slug, which has turned from white to browny-red after eating an anemone.

This Great grey sea slug (Aeolidia papillosa) has been eating an anemone and turned brown
This Great grey sea slug (Aeolidia papillosa) has been eating an anemone and turned brown

On the lowest part of the shore I find a yellow-clubbed sea slug (Limacia clavigera).

Limacia clavigera - the yellow-clubbed sea slug
Limacia clavigera – the yellow-clubbed sea slug

Best of all, among the many fish eggs I see under the rocks, there’s a sea slug feeding on a patch of goby eggs. It’s the rare Calma gobioophaga that I only recorded for the first time last week. It’s so impossibly small and well-camouflaged that the children need to view it on my camera to even see that it’s there.

A Calma gobioophaga sea slug feeding on goby eggs at Porth Mear
A Calma gobioophaga sea slug feeding on goby eggs at Porth Mear

By the time I return to our ‘shore laboratory’ to talk through our finds at the end of the session, it’s teeming with colourful anemones, painted top shells and many more lovely creatures. Everyone has done a good job of keeping the animals comfortable and safe, with crabs in separate buckets to prevent any injuries to the animals.

The kids show me their favourite finds and we talk about each of them and practice handling them safely. There are enough starfish for all the children to hold one at the same time. The fish are popular too and we have a good selection of species to look at; a shanny, rock goby, Cornish clingfish and a baby sea scorpion.

A juvenile scorpion fish.
A juvenile scorpion fish.

Before the tide turns, everyone helps out with carrying creatures back to the pools where we found them.

Trivia monacha - Three spot cowrie at Porth Mear
Trivia monacha – Three spot cowrie at Porth Mear

It must be getting on for 2pm by the time Junior and I reach the top of the bay and sit on the sand for a quick sandwich. It’s been a perfect day despite the iffy weather at the start and I hope that the children will remember it as well as I remember my own Fox Club trips. Who knows, perhaps Junior and his new friends will be back here leading an event some day?

A predator among the fish eggs: Calma gobioophaga sea slug

If you read this blog regularly, you’ve probably noticed a pattern: I bimble about the Cornish rock pools looking for an exciting creature, fail completely, then find something unexpected. Well, hopefully you like the format because this week is no exception. I go on a quest to find fish eggs and discover this rare sea slug.

Fish eggs are amazing. If you catch them just as they’re nearing hatching you can see each baby fish staring out, its tail curled tight around its head like a scarf.

So, when Junior announces he wants to go for a big walk, I suggest Port Nadler. This slightly exposed rocky bay is ideal for Cornish clingfish. Their distinctive yellow eggs usually carpet the underside of the rocks and their developing babies are especially beautiful.

Clingfish eggs - with one newly-hatched fish (centre)
Clingfish eggs – with one newly-hatched fish (centre)

Only the tide today isn’t low enough to access the clingfishes’ favourite gully.

I look in the pools and lose count of how many rocks I lift. There don’t seem to be any fish eggs. As the tide drops a little further, I come across some Berthella plumula sea slugs and a sea hare.

A pair of Berthella plumula sea slugs
A pair of Berthella plumula sea slugs

There’s an anemone I don’t recognise. Translucent white all over with a base so wide it looks like a bowl. I later realise it must be the white form of Sagartia elegans (var. nivea).

Sagartia elegans (var nivea) anemone
Sagartia elegans (var. nivea) anemone

Junior finishes his digging in the sand at the top of the beach and wanders over to join me. We lift a rock together and finally here are some eggs. They’re not the yellow clingfish eggs I was looking for, they’re smaller goby eggs, forming black-specked carpet of grey. Under the camera, the specks become a sea of eyes looking up at me.

It takes me a long time to decide that the Calma gobioophaga sea slug (in the background here) is 'a thing'
It takes me a long time to decide that the Calma gobioophaga sea slug (in the background here) is ‘a thing’

I remember rockpool expert David Fenwick, who runs the fabulous Aphotomarine site, telling me a year or two back that there was a species of sea slug that specialises in eating these eggs. I peer into the greyness and see nothing, apart from a thin yellowish patch in the centre which looks like a piece of sponge or sea squirt.

I look some more. The eggs around the edge of the yellow patch look longer than the others.

I stare, stare some more then focus my camera on the patch and do yet more staring. Even then I’m not sure, but it could be…

It’s only when I see a tentacle move that I begin to see the slug properly. It’s over a centimetre long, but most of its body is covered in pointed cerrata the colour and shape of goby eggs, right down to the black dots that ressemble eyes.

Calma gobioophaga on its goby egg prey, its eyes showing through behind its long rhinophores.
Calma gobioophaga on its goby egg prey, its eyes showing through behind its long rhinophores.

This is the weirdly named Calma gobioophaga egg-eating sea slug. It’s the first I’ve seen and only the second record of this species in Cornwall.

The yellowish patch I thought was a sea squirt is the slug’s back. It’s covered in pale circles, which my books tell me afterwards are the mature gonads. Who’d have thought?

The books also tells me that the slug absorbs the fish eggs so well into its gut that it has no need of an anus. That’s right; it doesn’t poo. I’m not sure how that works, but it’s the sort of fact that gets Junior’s attention.

Calma gobioophaga - the cerrata (tentacles) on its back blend perfectly with the goby eggs. Only the pale circles on its back (gonads) stand out.
Calma gobioophaga – the cerrata (tentacles) on its back blend perfectly with the goby eggs. Only the pale circles on its back (gonads) stand out.

It’s not the easiest thing to photograph: a grey blob on a mat of grey eggs on a grey day in silty water. As I start to get my eye in to the outline of the slug, it glides towards me, feeling the eggs with its tentacles and swinging its long rhinophores forwards.

Tucked immediately behind each rhinophore is a distinct black eye, one of the characteristic features of this species.

Calma gobioophaga on goby eggs (probably the eggs of a rock goby) near Looe, Cornwall
Calma gobioophaga on goby eggs (probably the eggs of a rock goby) near Looe, Cornwall

The books suggest this species only eats the eggs of the black goby (Gobius niger), but slugs are not great readers and the other records from Cornwall and Brittany are, like this one, probably on rock goby (Gobius paganellus) eggs. In the Mediterranean this species has also been recorded on giant goby (Gobius cobitis) eggs. There’s another, closely related, species of sea slug, Calma glaucoides, that feeds on a wider range of eggs, including clingfish eggs and has been recorded in Cornwall too. Hopefully I’ll find that one soon!

The slug’s life cycle intigues me. As fish eggs are available for such a short period of the year, I’m not sure what happens to these slugs during the remaining months.

It comes on to rain heavily and as we’re already soaked from exploring the rock pools, we call it a day. I haven’t found a single clingfish egg, but, as is the way with rockpooling, I’ve discovered something even better.

Discoveries on my Doorstep – Day Two (Hannafore, Looe)

Fairer conditions set in for the second day of rockpooling with the fabulous David Fenwick and the Coastwise North Devon team. Without the challenges of wind-blown pools and rain-spattered lenses to contend with, the day promises to be even more inspiring.

Martin holds a spiny starfish, Hannafore, Looe
Martin holds a spiny starfish, Hannafore, Looe

I’ve managed to replace Cornish Rock Pools Junior’s leaky wellies so he joins us to track down amazing creatures. Today we will focus on the lagoon and seagrass beds at Hannafore and I have no doubt I’ll be seeing something new.

Junior gets stuck into the task at hand; head down, bottom up, staring into the glassy water. He shrieks and comes wading over to me, taking care not to spill water from his precious tub. In it he has a plump sea slug, a ‘Great grey’ Aeolidia papillosa – or sheep slug as we call them.

Junior's 'Sheep slug' - Aeolidia papillosa - looking very fluffy
Junior’s ‘Sheep slug’ – Aeolidia papillosa – looking very fluffy

It’s a rusty colour from eating anemones and I’m allowed to stroke it. “It feels barely there, like air,” Junior explains. He looks after it for some while before returning it to the exact spot he found it.

I sight a little yellow blob and pop it in a plastic tube, expecting it to be a Lamellaria mollusc. A few minutes later it’s sprouted rhinophores on its head and is circling the tube like a hamster in a wheel. It’s a Jorunna tomentosa sea slug.

Jorunna tomentosa sea slug, Hannafore, Looe
Jorunna tomentosa sea slug, Hannafore, Looe

Meanwhile, David Fenwick is making amazing finds. He’s especially interested in the small spider crabs today and is keen to identify some more species. It pays off – by examining one under a microscope before returning it to the shore he discovers an Achaeus cranchii, last recorded in 1909. David has posted his fantastic photos on his site Aphotomarine here: http://www.aphotomarine.com/crab_achaeus_cranchii.html

A small spider crab - there are several species in Looe including some rare ones as we found out!
A small spider crab – there are several species in Looe including some rare ones as we found out!

Someone points out these stunning Eubranchus faranni sea slugs to me. They’re some of the most spectacular little nudibranchs I’ve ever seen. Although their body shape is the same, the two slugs are entirely different colours: one orange, one black. Both are feeding on hydroids (the tiny fern-shaped animals that you can see on the seaweed).

Eubranchus faranni sea slug feeding on hydroids, Looe
Eubranchus faranni sea slug feeding on hydroids, Looe
A more typically coloured orange Eubranchus faranni, Looe.
A more typically coloured orange Eubranchus faranni, Looe.
The black Eubranchus faranni sea slug showing the orange markings on its back.
The black Eubranchus faranni sea slug showing the orange markings on its back.

We all keep an eye out for baby cat sharks as this area is a nursery for their egg cases and we often see hatchlings this time of year. Rob spots one, a recently hatched greater spotted catshark (Scyliorhinus stellaris) and we all gather to look at it. Junior touches its rough back and watches it swim a short distance.

The baby catshark, Scyliorhinus stellaris, resting on the bottom of the pool.
The baby catshark, Scyliorhinus stellaris, resting on the bottom of the pool.
Catshark, Scyliorhinus stellaris, Hannafore, Looe.
Baby catshark, Scyliorhinus stellaris, Hannafore, Looe. These sharks have skin that feels like sandpaper, but is very hydrodynamic.

When the tide turns we start to make our way back to shore; the water floods in quickly across these shallow lagoons and can easily catch you out. As usual, this is the moment when I make my best find. I’ve just said to Jan from Coastwise how nice it is not to look at stalked jellyfish, which, pretty as they are, are frankly becoming a bit tedious after a whole winter of dedicated surveys to record them. Then something catches my eye.

Stalked jellyfish (Calvadosia cruxmelitensis) conjoined twins.
Stalked jellyfish (Calvadosia cruxmelitensis) conjoined twins.

Yes, it’s a stalked jellyfish, but this one is different. It’s a Calvadosia cruxmelitensis, always a pretty species, only it appears to have a reflection behind it, an exact mirror image. Closer inspection confirms that this is a double-headed stalked jellyfish, the first I’ve ever seen. Jan and I take photos as the tide creeps up our boots.

My first double-headed stalked jellyfish (Calvadosia cruxmelitensis), Looe
My first double-headed stalked jellyfish (Calvadosia cruxmelitensis), Looe

After hours wading through the water, bending down, climbing over rocks and lifting stones, we’re all slump down, exhausted onto the pipeway to munch a late picnic lunch and swap notes while the tide pushes in around our feet.

By sharing our finds and knowledge we’ve all seen new things and I’ve learned a huge amount about this familiar shore.

A tortoiseshell limpet
A tortoiseshell limpet
A beautifully 'fluffy' isopod - Cymodice truncata male I think.
A beautifully ‘fluffy’ isopod – Cymodice truncata male I think.
A toothed crab (Pirimela denticulata), Hannafore, Looe
A toothed crab (Pirimela denticulata), Hannafore, Looe
Blue-rayed limpet, Hannafore, Looe
Blue-rayed limpet, Hannafore, Looe
Daisy anemone, Hannafore, Looe
Daisy anemone, Hannafore, Looe
A very well-fed Aplysia puncata sea hare
A very well-fed Aplysia puncata sea hare

Discoveries on my Doorstep – Rockpooling with the experts in Looe (Day 1)

There’s a questionable theory that 10 000 hours of practice makes you an expert and I may be close to ‘doing my time’ in the Cornish rock pools by now. However, I often feel I’m only scratching the surface of what’s out there. What better then, than to spend a few days on the shore with the genius that is David Fenwick, creator of Aphotomarine together with a fabulous group of fellow rockpool fanatics from Coastwise North Devon?

With layers and waterproofs aplenty, Junior and I joined them at Hannafore Beach, a site I know intimately, to see what new discoveries might await us.

 I realised within minutes that I should have brought a notebook. David’s knowledge of marine species is immense and he wasted no time in finding signs of nematode worms living inside seaweed, reeling off their names. It was windy, drizzling and cold and to make matters worse Junior sprung a leak in his wellies, but there was no doubt this is going to be a fascinating day. Leaving Junior playing at reconstructing ancient ruined cities from the rocks of a mid-shore ridge, we waded across the lower shore.

Sea hares (Aplysia punctata) were everywhere munching on the seaweed.
Sea hares (Aplysia punctata) were everywhere munching on the seaweed.

Some species were familiar. The sea hares were everywhere and so abundant that it was impossible to avoid them. This swirling cloud of purple ink in the water was a sign we’d accidentally disturbed one of them.

We must have accidentally disturbed a sea hare (Aplysia punctata), making it release a cloud of purple ink.
We must have accidentally disturbed a sea hare (Aplysia punctata), making it release a cloud of purple ink.

Although Greater-spotted catshark (Scyliorhinus stellaris) egg cases are commonly found on parts of Hannafore we found more than I’ve seen before in this particular area, suggesting the nursery is more extensive than I’d realised. The eggs were at various stages from recently laid, smooth cases to bio-encrusted cases that had been in the water for months and seemed close to hatching.

A recently-laid catshark eggcase clearly showing the yolk sac inside
A recently-laid catshark eggcase clearly showing the yolk sac inside

Rob from Coastwise North Devon made one of my favourite finds of the day, this hairy hermit crab, Pagurus cuanensis, had some of the hairiest knees I’ve seen in a while.

Pagurus cuanensis, the 'Hairy hermit'.
Pagurus cuanensis, the ‘Hairy hermit’.

David Fenwick was finding creatures at a dizzying rate. The speed with which he could pick out and name the different animals under each boulder was incredible.

Boring sponge under a boulder
Boring sponge under a boulder
A Calvadosia cruxmelitensis stalked jellyfish
A Calvadosia cruxmelitensis stalked jellyfish

Wading through the myriad colours of the seaweeds and past the many pretty Calvadosia cruxmelitensis stalked jellyfish clinging to them, we came to some rocks that are exposed to more current than some other parts of the beach. (Check out David’s brilliant Stauromedusae site to find out more about stalked jellyfish),

Under a deep overhang where I sometimes see lobsters, there was a small cluster of green and turquoise jewel anemones. They look more impressive when they’re open underwater, with little beads on the end of each tentacle, but I love the colours.

Jewel anemone
Jewel anemone

After a while, I spotted a colourful squat lobster, Galathea strigosa, scuttling across the back of an overhang and dived headlong in to retrieve it.

Galathea strigosa - the Spiny squat lobster
Galathea strigosa – the Spiny squat lobster

The wind on the pools was making it difficult to see much and my camera lens was steamed up, but we crammed in a last few minutes of rockpooling, looking at sea slugs, fish and hermit crabs before calling an end to day 1.

Aeolidella alderi sea slug - this slug looks similar to the common grey (Aeolidia papillosa) at first sight but is more slender with a white 'ruff' of cerrata at its neck.
Aeolidella alderi sea slug – this slug looks similar to the common grey (Aeolidia papillosa) at first sight but is more slender with a white ‘ruff’ of cerrata at its neck.
The more common great grey sea slug (Aeolidia papillosa) looking like it has probably just guzzled a red anemone!
The more common great grey sea slug (Aeolidia papillosa) looking like it has probably just guzzled a red anemone!
An Anapagurus hyndmanni hermit crab.
An Anapagurus hyndmanni hermit crab.
Montagu's sea snail (a fish)
Montagu’s sea snail (a fish)
A small spider crab (Macropodia sp. I think...) - David found did an amazing job of identifying a few of these tiny crabs to species level.
A small spider crab (Macropodia sp. I think…) – David found did an amazing job of identifying a few of these tiny crabs to species level.

Coming soon – Part 2 of rockpooling with the experts!

Cross-Border Rockpooling with the Porcupine Marine Natural History Society

It sometimes feels like I don’t get out much – either socially or out of the county (Not that it’s a hardship to be in Cornwall!). So, I could barely contain my excitement at having the opportunity to attend the Porcupine Marine Natural History Society Conference in Plymouth. I packed my passport and set forth across the Tamar.

Not only did I mingle with the most amazing bunch of fellow marine wildlife obsessives and hear their latest findings, but the third day of the conference was spent rockpooling at Wembury in South Devon.

 

A prickle of Porcupines at work
A prickle of Porcupines at work at Wembury, Devon

While the environment at Wembury is similar to my home patch in South East Cornwall, a major difference is that Wembury has a marine centre, staffed by lovely people from the Devon Wildlife Trust. The centre promotes marine conservation and runs all sorts of public and educational events. It also provided a handy indoor base to set up some microscopes and a refreshment station. Luxury after my recent all-weather forays!

Coral, from the Marine Centre, was especially interested to know of any stalked jellyfish finds as past records suggest they used to be more abundant. Having spent the last few months doing stalked jellyfish surveys, I was starting to see them in my sleep, so I was happy to take a look.

Sure enough, there were plenty of stalked jellyfish there, the lower shore pools and gullies were ideal for them. One small clump of seaweed I looked at had six Calvadosia cruxmelitensis on it.

Calvadosia cruxmelitensis stalked jellyfish at Wembury, Devon
Calvadosia cruxmelitensis stalked jellyfish at Wembury, Devon

I also found several Craterolophus convolvulus, a species that I see less frequently, although it does occur in my home patch. It looks like it has four twisted coils of rope running down to the centre and has a wide base with a goblet-like profile.

A Craterolophus convoluvulus stalked jellydish at Wembury, Devon
A Craterolophus convoluvulus stalked jellydish at Wembury, Devon

 

Side view of a Craterolophus convolvulus stalked jellyfish at Wembury, Devon
Side view of a Craterolophus convolvulus stalked jellyfish at Wembury, Devon

This was my first visit to Wembury and I couldn’t bring myself to spend all my time looking at stalked jellyfish, lovely though they are. Having established there were lots of them, I set my mind to other things. 

Spotting a patch of a thick green, finger-like seaweed, Codium. I looked for the wonderful Photosynthesising sea slug (Elysia viridis). All my books say it loves nothing better than this seaweed, but so far I’ve always found them on other things. Today, for the first time, I discovered one that had clearly read the same book as me.

An Elysia vididis sea slug showing off its bright green spots and eating Codium seaweed just like it's supposed to!
An Elysia vididis sea slug showing off its bright green spots and eating Codium seaweed just like it’s supposed to!

These slugs retain chloroplasts from their food in their bodies, where they carry on photosynthesising to provide the slug with energy or other benefits. This one wasn’t a particularly vivid green, but it’s still pretty amazing to see a solar powered slug. 

Slugs were plentiful elsewhere on the shore too, although I didn’t come across anything particularly unusual. I loved this frilly little pair of Goniodoris nodosa.

Goniodoris nodosa sea slugs at Wembury, Devon
Goniodoris nodosa sea slugs at Wembury, Devon
A frilly sea slug - Goniodoris nodosa - at Wembury, Devon
A frilly sea slug – Goniodoris nodosa – at Wembury, Devon

This Berthella plumula was exploring the rocks and I saw the spawn of several species of sea slug, so there will soon be babies about!

Berthella plumula sea slug at Wembury, Devon
Berthella plumula sea slug at Wembury, Devon

In February, the only sea hares I could find were a few millimetres long. Today they’re several centimetres long and developing their adult leopard-spot colours.

Sea hare (Aplysia punctata) growing nicely at Wembury, Devon
Sea hare (Aplysia punctata) growing nicely at Wembury, Devon

The small clingfish species were abundant, but I didn’t attempt to check their teeth to see which species they were!

The books say to check the species by checking the teeth - not easy with a tiny clingfish like this one!
The books say to check the species by checking the teeth – not easy with a tiny clingfish like this one!

 

A small clingfish species (small headed or two-spot) at Wembury, Devon
A small clingfish species (small headed or two-spot) at Wembury, Devon

This male worm pipefish looked smart in his limpet-hat. He was carrying eggs in his belly-groove so I popped him straight back in his pool. 

Male pipefish with eggs wearing a limpet-shell hat at Wembury, Devon
Male Worm pipefish with eggs sporting a limpet-shell hat at Wembury, Devon

As you’d expect, there was no shortage of crabs. This tiny Anapagurus hyndmanni hermit crab caught my eye as it scuttled across the sand. They don’t grow more than about a centimetre long, but their right claw is about as long again and looks it’s wearing a huge white boxing glove. There were several around once I got my eye in.

Hermit crab (Anapgurus hyndmanni) showing it's huge white claw.
Hermit crab (Anapgurus hyndmanni) showing its huge white claw.

 

Anapagurus hyndmanni hermit crab at Wembury, Devon
Anapagurus hyndmanni hermit crab at Wembury, Devon

It was wonderful to share finds with other ‘Porcupines’, as members of the society refer to each other. The society is named after HMS Porcupine, although I’m more than a little vague as to why! One unusual discovery was this purple whelk, Raphitoma purpurea.

Raphitoma purpurea shell at Wembury, Devon
Raphitoma purpurea shell at Wembury, Devon

Inevitably I got carried away on the shore and didn’t think to have lunch until the tide was washing over my boots. By the time I’d gulped down a sandwich and some delicious M&S chocolate tiffin (a perk of having visited Plymouth!), all the Porcupines were assembled in the Marine Centre swapping notes and checking identifications. After a very pleasant half-hour checking other people’s stalked jelly photos and generally enthusing, it was time to cross the border back to Kernow once more.

I might not get to meet up with everyone like this very often – I’m pretty unlikely to make it to the next event in Newcastle for obvious reasons – but it’s inspiring to feel part of a national network of people who are all passionate about the same things as me.

So, a huge thank you goes to all the ‘Porcupines’ for making me welcome at my first conference, to Wembury Marine Centre and to my other half and Cornish Rockpools Junior for being patient with me while I nattered for hours about marine creatures with my new friends.

 Thanks also to you for sharing my adventures. Bonus photos follow for reading this far!

A lovely yellow Ophiothrix fragilis brittle star at Wembury, Devon
A lovely yellow Ophiothrix fragilis brittle star at Wembury, Devon
Close-up of a spiny starfish arm, Wembury, Devon
Close-up of a spiny starfish arm, Wembury, Devon
A black brittle star (Ophiocomina nigra) at Wembury, Devon
A black brittle star (Ophiocomina nigra) at Wembury, Devon
A Cornish clingfish over the border in Wembury, Devon
A Cornish clingfish over the border in Wembury, Devon

Happy rockpooling everyone!

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