Tag Archives: pipefish

Hatchlings in the rock pools at Port Nadler

A sunny bank holiday weekend followed by a sunny half-term week is nothing short of a miracle. That the second weekend also coincided with some big spring tides is more amazing still.

I’ve seen some wonderful photos this week of rockpooling finds all around Cornwall. Some fabulous creatures. And if you haven’t been able to explore the shore yourself, Springwatch tonight (8th June) are going to be showing footage of the remarkable comeback of the Clybanarius ethryropus (nope, still can’t pronounce it) hermit crab, filmed with Cornwall Wildlife Trust at Castle Beach, Falmouth.

The stars of my pretty perfect day of wading through pools in the blazing sunshine at Port Nadler, near Looe, were the baby fish.

There are plenty of young fish around at the moment but the new hatchlings can hard to spot. I took this photo of clingfish eggs to capture the eyes staring out of each eggs and the little spotty tails curled round them.

Clingfish eggs hatching in a Cornish rock pool.
Clingfish eggs hatching in a Cornish rock pool.

It was only when I uploaded photo to my laptop that I realised I’d managed to capture my first hatchling (in the centre of the picture). I can’t get enough of those golden eyes.

A recently hatched Cornish clingfish among its egg-bound siblings
A recently hatched Cornish clingfish among its egg-bound siblings

Fish often stick around to guard their eggs and sure enough there was a proud parent next to this rock.

An adult Cornish clingfish showing the typical beaky nose, antenna by the eyes and blue patches on the head.
An adult Cornish clingfish showing the typical beaky nose, antenna by the eyes and blue patches on the head.

I was up to my waist between rocks leading to the open sea when I saw this pale creature, about 4cm long, wriggling amongst the darker kelp. From its elongated, looping form I expected a worm.

A recently-hatched Greater pipefish baby.
A recently-hatched Greater pipefish baby.

On closer inspection the large eyes and fins were clear. This is the first time I’ve ever seen a baby pipefish.

A baby Greater pipefish with yolk sac still attached. The large eyes and long snout are reminiscent of its cousins, the seahorses.
A baby Greater pipefish with yolk sac still attached. The large eyes and long snout are reminiscent of its cousins, the seahorses.

Judging by the yolk sac still attached to its belly, this little fish hatched very recently. I saw several more in the water, their curling movements reminding me of their cousins the seahorses. I wondered if the dad was close by – like seahorses, the male pipefish looks after the gestating eggs in his pouch until they hatch – but he’d be too well camouflaged to spot in this seaweed.

 The rocks were crawling with crabs and the pools were busy with the fry of larger fish that use these sheltered waters as nurseries. My camera battery was low, but this Limacia clavigera sea slug was worth draining my battery for.

A Limacia clavigera sea slug on the move.
A Limacia clavigera sea slug on the move.

 The water was so warm after a week of sun that I put on my snorkel for the first time this year and enjoyed a leisurely float across the bay, watching wrasse skirting the rocks and snakelocks anemones waving in the current. 

If this weather carries on, I can see myself returning to Port Nadler regularly this summer to watch the baby fish growing up.

Cornish Rock Pools junior drying off in the sunshine at Port Nadler, near Looe.
Cornish Rock Pools junior drying off in the sunshine at Port Nadler, near Looe.
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Giant birthday surprises – a rare sea hare and a greater pipefish

There are lots of benefits to having a summer birthday; the sun usually shines, the rock pools shimmer and it’s just about warm enough to put my snorkel on and jump in. The beach has lots of presents in store for me today, including a huge greater pipefish, a cousin of the sea horse, and a rare sea slug. No unwrapping required.

A juvenile Aplysia depilans - a rare sea hare in UK waters.
A juvenile Aplysia depilans – a rare sea hare in UK waters.

It’s holiday season , but a little planning and some walking is all that is needed to find a peaceful cove. We set off to Port Nadler in perfect, calm conditions loaded with wetsuits, buckets and an ample picnic.

A typical rock pool at Port Nadler near Looe
A typical rock pool at Port Nadler near Looe

Under a rock I spot what I think is a very large anemone, but it looks odd. I’m still trying to puzzle it out when it crawls away, unfurling long ear-like tentacles from its head. It’s a sea hare but more bulky than the ones I normally see (Aplysia punctata).

I think I've found a strange anemone
I think I’ve found a strange anemone
Surprise! It turns into a sea hare.
Surprise! It turns into a sea hare.

As it oozes towards me across the rock I’m struck by its face, more like a hippo than a hare with wide flapping ears and a broad snout. Very occasionally larger sea hares, Aplysia depilans, have been found around the southern shores of the UK, and I begin to wonder.

Aplysia depilans - looking more like a sea hippo than a sea hare
Aplysia depilans – looking more like a sea hippo than a sea hare

I contact experts who have seen them before and they confirm it is a juvenile Aplysia deplians – a rare find and a species I’ve never seen before. Happy birthday to me!

It’s still cold for snorkelling and I only last about a quarter of an hour before my teeth start to chatter, but it’s worth it. After several minutes of seeing nothing but kelp, silt and the occasional two-spot goby, a long snake-like body catches my eye. It’s the unmistakeable shape of a greater pipefish (Syngnathus acus).

The greater pipefish looks out from the weeds
The greater pipefish looks out from the weeds

These fish grow to about arm length and have a hexagonal cross-section. This one hardly moves, relying on camouflage for defence, its long nose stretching out over the sand.

Greater pipefish - a cousin of the seahorse
Greater pipefish – a cousin of the seahorse

I drift back into shore, and find a compass jellyfish (Chrysaora hysoscella) stranded in the shallows. It takes its name from the beautiful markings on its back, but I don’t go too close – sea nettle is its other common name.

Compass jellyfish - showing its distinctive markings
Compass jellyfish – showing its distinctive markings

Back on the shore, I huddle on the sand, wrapped in jumpers and towels, shivering and eating cake. Birthdays don’t get any better than this.

This snakelocks anemone looks like it's had a fright - the tentacles were being picked up by the current
This snakelocks anemone looks like it’s had a fright – the tentacles were being picked up by the current

 

Up close to a red-eyed velvet swimming crab (Necora puber)
Up close to a red-eyed velvet swimming crab (Necora puber)

 

Cornish clingfish eggs - little eyes and noses visible inside
Cornish clingfish eggs – little eyes and noses visible inside
A snorkel-scape. Thong weed at Port Nadler near Looe
A snorkel-scape. Thong weed at Port Nadler near Looe