December Stalked Jellyfish survey with Natural England

Christmas Rockpooling in Looe

I doubt anyone in Looe can have missed it – the moment today when Cornish Rock Pools Junior found his first stalked jellyfish. His scream of, “I’ve actually found one!” rang across the beach and echoed off the hillside.

Cornish rockpool junior's first stalked jellyfish - Calvadosia cruxmelitensis
Cornish rockpool junior’s first stalked jellyfish – Calvadosia cruxmelitensis

His first find was closely followed by his second, next to which was a third. A volunteer from Looe Marine Conservation Group found a fourth. The Natural England team found some more and by the time we were done we recorded a whopping 26 Stalked jellyfish.

Calvadosia campanulata stalked jellyfish
Calvadosia campanulata stalked jellyfish

As all our records today were of two species (Calvadosia cruxmelitensis and Calvadosia campanulata) I’m feeling hopeful that they may soon be added as recognised features of the Looe and Whitsand Bay Marine Conservation Zone.

Looe Marine Conservation Group volunteer, Dawn, finds her first Stalked jellyfish on our survey
Looe Marine Conservation Group volunteer, Dawn, finds her first Stalked jellyfish on our survey

In December, good tides, mild temperatures and low winds coincide about as often as it snows on the Cornish coast (i.e. about once every ten years). Amazingly, today was one of those rare occasions and the rockpools were in impressive festive colours. What could be more Christmassy than this Dahlia anemone?

Festive colours in the Cornish rock pools - a Dahlia anemone
Festive colours in the Cornish rock pools – a Dahlia anemone

We were doing so well with our stalked jellyfish survey that I didn’t feel too bad about getting distracted. When I spotted a wriggling piece of seaweed, I chased it across the rocks.

If a piece of seaweed runs off, it's probably a spider crab
If a piece of seaweed runs off, it’s probably a spider crab

As I suspected, under the seaweed decorations was a small spider crab species. This one was a Macropodia deflexa, a long-legged spider crab.

A Macropodia deflexa crab - covered in seaweed decorations
A Macropodia deflexa crab – covered in seaweed decorations

Relying on their camouflage, scorpion fish were lying still among the seaweed, allowing us to come right up to them.

A scorpion fish hides among the seaweed
A scorpion fish hides among the seaweed

It was a huge relief that everything turned out so well for our Stalked jellyfish survey. Had the conditions been less favourable we’d have been more likely to find none at all. 26 was an amazing total.

I needed my hot chocolate afterwards, but it was an afternoon well spent with some fabulous people. And tomorrow the forecast is even better… I’ll let you know what I find!

Another Christmas sea-flower - the Daisy anemone. In full bloom at Hannafore, Looe
Another Christmas sea-flower – the Daisy anemone. In full bloom at Hannafore, Looe
Like a string of Christmas lights - the Blue-rayed limpet
Like a string of Christmas lights – the Blue-rayed limpet
Our Stalked jellyfish survey at Hannafore Beach, West Looe
Our Stalked jellyfish survey at Hannafore Beach, West Looe

 

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