Flat periwinkle in the Cornish rock pools

Colourful and Endearing – Video: Meet the Flat Periwinkle

If you’ve ever collected shells on the shore, you’ve probably homed in on the bright yellow, orange, white and even chequerboard colours of the flat periwinkle. Their shells look like a miniature version of the garden snail, but smaller, tougher and much, much brighter.

Flat periwinkle in a Cornish rock pool
A flat periwinkle on the mid-shore seaweed

This time of year, when the seas are rough and the lower shore is hard to reach, I love to search among the seaweeds of the mid and upper shore. The flat periwinkles’ vivid colours shine out like jewels among the tangle of brown seaweeds.

On a damp day at my local beach, it doesn’t take me long to find dozens of them. They’re in no danger of drying out today so they’re busy grazing, tentacles waving from side to side, black eyes on the lookout for crabs and other predators.

An orange-banded flat periwinkle on the move - showing its eye and tentacles.
An orange-banded flat periwinkle on the move – showing its eye and tentacles.

Close-up they’re endearing little things, a herd of gentle grazers feeling their way through the swathes of seaweed. In this video you can see how they search out food with their tentacles. Watch them reaching out their proboscis mouth, pink radula pulsing as they rasp away at the seaweed.

In a patch of seaweed around five metres square, I find a huge variety of colours. These variations probably offer some protection from predators, as does the covering of microalgae on many flat periwinkles, which gives them a green colour.

Some flat periwinkles are white or cream coloured
Some flat periwinkles are white or cream coloured

Whatever the reasons for their varied colours, they make the flat periwinkle one of the most striking shells on the shore. (Note: If you collect shells, please always remember to check they’re empty before you take them home.)

Some flat periwinkles are black or brown. The variety probably provides protection from predators.
Some flat periwinkles are black or brown. The variety probably provides protection from predators.

It’s so easy to get close to these animals and watch them in action. Look out for them next time you’re at the beach.

 About flat periwinkles…

There are two species of flat periwinkle, Littorina obtusata and Littorina mariae. In theory L. mariae has a flatter profile and is the smaller of the two with a thicker shell, but on the shore they vary and mix so it is hard to distinguish between the two species.

Generally, you find Littorina obtusata on the mid-upper shore, especially on egg wrack and Littorina mariae on the lower shore, especially on serrated wrack. The main difference is that L. obtusata tucks into the seaweeds it lives on, whereas L. mariae likes to graze on organisms that live on the its preferred seaweeds. Each one prefers to live on the seaweeds mainly found on its own zone of the shore.

The animals in these pictures are almost certainly Littorina obtusata given their location and diet. However, as far as I know the only way to be certain is to examine the animal’s penis – not something I intend to do. The Field Studies Council have a great paper on the habits and identification of the two flat periwinkle species (including penis shapes) here: http://fsj.field-studies-council.org/media/342551/vol7.3_202.pdf. Take a look if you’d like to know more.

A tiny yellow flat periwinkle grazing among the Cornish rock pools.
A tiny yellow flat periwinkle grazing among the Cornish rock pools.

 

 

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6 thoughts on “Colourful and Endearing – Video: Meet the Flat Periwinkle”

    1. Thanks Sean, it has been a while. I had to focus on finishing my final MA project and looking after a house full of visitors the last couple of months. It’s also been very wet and windy so not many chances to get out on the shore safely. I have gathered photos of things I’ve found washed up though, so that may well be my next blog post. There are some fabulous tides in the next few months too which I’m very excited about.

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      1. You have a lot to catch up on then. I’ve been busy drawing sperm whales and seeing some great coastal wildlife from glaucous gulls to long-tailed ducks.

        Liked by 1 person

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