Tag Archives: fish

Sharing the Love of Rockpooling

This week I’m planning rockpooling events for next year and adding identification pages to my website….

Yesterday it was so foggy you couldn’t see the sea in front of your wellies. Before that it was raining; before that it was blowing a gale and on the one day the sun came out I was nowhere near the beach. It’s not bad for eggcase hunts – which Cornish Rock Pools junior loves – but that’s about it.

This time of year, when the short days and inclement weather make even die-hard rockpoolers like me reach for the duvet, I turn to flicking through the 2017 tide table and dreaming of sunny days and gleaming expanses of shore.

Is it too early for New Year’s resolutions? Mine is to spend (even) more time sharing my love of rockpooling with others. I’ve put all the Looe Marine Conservation Group rockpooling events in my diary and I’m also hoping to volunteer with the utterly fabulous Fox Club (the junior branch of the Cornwall Wildlife Trust), helping to run events around the county. Then there will be other events for the local scouts and home educating groups to fit in, and who knows what else. Continue reading Sharing the Love of Rockpooling

Hatchlings in the rock pools at Port Nadler

A sunny bank holiday weekend followed by a sunny half-term week is nothing short of a miracle. That the second weekend also coincided with some big spring tides is more amazing still.

I’ve seen some wonderful photos this week of rockpooling finds all around Cornwall. Some fabulous creatures. And if you haven’t been able to explore the shore yourself, Springwatch tonight (8th June) are going to be showing footage of the remarkable comeback of the Clybanarius ethryropus (nope, still can’t pronounce it) hermit crab, filmed with Cornwall Wildlife Trust at Castle Beach, Falmouth.

The stars of my pretty perfect day of wading through pools in the blazing sunshine at Port Nadler, near Looe, were the baby fish.

There are plenty of young fish around at the moment but the new hatchlings can hard to spot. I took this photo of clingfish eggs to capture the eyes staring out of each eggs and the little spotty tails curled round them.

Clingfish eggs hatching in a Cornish rock pool.
Clingfish eggs hatching in a Cornish rock pool.

It was only when I uploaded photo to my laptop that I realised I’d managed to capture my first hatchling (in the centre of the picture). I can’t get enough of those golden eyes.

A recently hatched Cornish clingfish among its egg-bound siblings
A recently hatched Cornish clingfish among its egg-bound siblings

Fish often stick around to guard their eggs and sure enough there was a proud parent next to this rock.

An adult Cornish clingfish showing the typical beaky nose, antenna by the eyes and blue patches on the head.
An adult Cornish clingfish showing the typical beaky nose, antenna by the eyes and blue patches on the head.

I was up to my waist between rocks leading to the open sea when I saw this pale creature, about 4cm long, wriggling amongst the darker kelp. From its elongated, looping form I expected a worm.

A recently-hatched Greater pipefish baby.
A recently-hatched Greater pipefish baby.

On closer inspection the large eyes and fins were clear. This is the first time I’ve ever seen a baby pipefish.

A baby Greater pipefish with yolk sac still attached. The large eyes and long snout are reminiscent of its cousins, the seahorses.
A baby Greater pipefish with yolk sac still attached. The large eyes and long snout are reminiscent of its cousins, the seahorses.

Judging by the yolk sac still attached to its belly, this little fish hatched very recently. I saw several more in the water, their curling movements reminding me of their cousins the seahorses. I wondered if the dad was close by – like seahorses, the male pipefish looks after the gestating eggs in his pouch until they hatch – but he’d be too well camouflaged to spot in this seaweed.

 The rocks were crawling with crabs and the pools were busy with the fry of larger fish that use these sheltered waters as nurseries. My camera battery was low, but this Limacia clavigera sea slug was worth draining my battery for.

A Limacia clavigera sea slug on the move.
A Limacia clavigera sea slug on the move.

 The water was so warm after a week of sun that I put on my snorkel for the first time this year and enjoyed a leisurely float across the bay, watching wrasse skirting the rocks and snakelocks anemones waving in the current. 

If this weather carries on, I can see myself returning to Port Nadler regularly this summer to watch the baby fish growing up.

Cornish Rock Pools junior drying off in the sunshine at Port Nadler, near Looe.
Cornish Rock Pools junior drying off in the sunshine at Port Nadler, near Looe.

Autumn in the Cornish Rock Pools

Autumn is a time of great change in the Cornish rock pools, but on the surface this could be mid-summer. The water is warm, the sun is blazing and an immense low tide is beckoning. I accompany a group of under-fives and their parents as they set out to investigate.

On land, the yellow tinge of autumn is only just creeping across the woods, but in the rock pools, the seaweeds have already died back. The invasive Japanese wireweed (Sargassum muticum) that clogs the pools all summer with long tresses like knotted hair all summer has thinned away, making it easier to see into the water.

A daisy anemone in clear water
A daisy anemone in clear water

There are many species that visit the shore in spring and summer to breed and some of these are long gone, but there’s still plenty to see. I was surprised to find a worm pipefish (Nerophys lumbriciformis) with eggs this late in the year. The pipefish are closely related to the seahorses, so it is the male that carries the eggs in a special groove on his belly. Continue reading Autumn in the Cornish Rock Pools

A perfect rockpool ramble in Looe

Friday was the ideal day for a Cornish rockpool ramble with warm weather and calm conditions. Over a hundred people joined the Looe Marine Conservation Group rockpool event and I’m sure other rockpooling sessions around the Cornwall were similarly well attended. (Here’s a list of what’s on this summer).

Learning about crabs with a Looe Marine Conservation Group volunteer
Learning about crabs with a Looe Marine Conservation Group volunteer

Continue reading A perfect rockpool ramble in Looe

Rockpooling With Mum

My mum will be seventy this year, but she cuts a sprightly figure as she steps across the rocks at Castle Beach. In a rare, precious moment we have time together, surrounded by glittering pools and a wide open bay.

Mum exploring Cornish rock pools.
Rockpooling with Mum, Castle Beach, Cornwall.

These are the moments we hoped for not so many years ago when Mum was lying in a hospital bed, hooked up to a blood transfusion to give her the strength to make it through her cancer operation. Continue reading Rockpooling With Mum

Boiling Seas and Shipwrecked Sailors

There’s no mistaking a change in our rock pools this week. There’s a new chill in the Cornish sea breeze. The shrill cries of swallows swooping over the water and children jumping the waves will soon fall silent as the days shorten and the autumn gales brew. The seas, however, are bursting with life.

Stranded fish
A fish stranded in a Cornish rock pool

Continue reading Boiling Seas and Shipwrecked Sailors