Tag Archives: cornwall

A Swim Over The Rock Pools

“Quick, I need the camera. There’s a jelly.”

Junior’s enthusiasm takes me aback. He has a healthy aversion to getting close to jellyfish. We have already changed course many times on today’s high tide swim to avoid the trailing tentacles of compass jellyfish.

Compass jellyfish. Also known as sea nettles as they pack quite a little sting, these jellyfish have beautiful markings.
The distinctive markings of the compass jellyfish.

These common summer visitors have striking brown V-shaped markings around their edges, like the points of a compass. Although their sting is rarely serious, somewhere in the region of a stinging nettle in strength, it isn’t much fun if you swim face-first into one as I have done on a few occasions.

Crystal jelly. This is a hydroid medusa rather than a ‘true’ jellyfish. It has short tentacles around the edges rather than long trailing tentacles.

Some other species we have seen this week, like the moon jellyfish and crystal jellyfish, are harmless but today only the compass jellies are out.

One of many moon jellyfish washed up by the strong swell. This species is harmless.
Moon jellyfish only have a very weak sting so are usually harmless to people. Never touch a jelly if you’re not sure of the species and wash your hands well before touching your eyes.

Incredible numbers of sand eels fill the water in every direction, flashing silver as they turn, before melding into the green sea. Junior notices a small spotted catshark (Scyliorhinus canicula) – also known as dogfish – swimming through a rocky gully beneath us. Alongside submerged rocks, several species of wrasse flit among the kelp.

This sand eel is speeding along – photo by Junior

I unclip the camera from the safety float and pass it to Junior who is pointing excitedly at something I can’t see.

I dip under the water and look at where he’s pointing. Still nothing. I bob up for air and try again.

This time I see something much smaller than I was expecting, or half see it – it’s mostly transparent with just the faintest pink hue.

Comb jelly – photo by Junior

“Is it a comb jelly?” Junior asks. This is the first one he’s seen and much excitement ensues as he tries to photograph a barely visible tiny swimming thing while holding his breath and floating in water 5 metres deep.

Comb jelly by Junior. The transparency of the animal and its movement in the water make it hard to focus, but you can see the shining light of the combs.

Mostly we just enjoy the incredible coloured light show this Beroe cucumis comb jelly is putting on for us. The iridescent disco-light effect is created by lines of beating hair-like cilia (the combs) that run the length of the comb jelly’s body.

This species looks like a simple hollow tube or sack, but it is an efficient predator, known to feed on other comb jellies.

The different colours of the lights around the edges of the comb jelly are incredible to watch. Photo by Junior.

How Junior spotted this little speck in the ocean, I have no idea. We look around for more but find none.

Comb jelly by Junior.

Eventually we have to head back to shore, drifting over all of our familiar rock pools on the way. Hermit crabs and netted dog whelks are out in force and as we near the beach, we see shannies basking on sunny rocks in the shallows.

There are lots of these ‘south clawed’ hermit crabs (Diogenes pugilator) on the sand. Their left claw is much longer and larger than their right.

This might not be rock pooling in the usual sense, swimming on a high tide gives us a whole new perspective on life here. You don’t need to be a billionaire to become weightless and take a soundless flight over the rock pools. There is no better way to see how this environment looks for most of each day, when the wider ocean and the shore cross over and become one.

Swimming in the sea in Cornwall is a wonderful experience but is very different from swimming in a pool and can be dangerous. Always consider the conditions and stay well within your limits. Check the weather, tides and currents, enter the water slowly and adjust to the temperature. Choose a lifeguarded beach if possible and a place where you know how to safely enter and exit the water. Swim alongside the shore. A tow float makes you more visible and beach shoes can protect you from weever fish and sharp rocks. Don’t swim alone and let someone know where you are. In any emergency at sea or on the shore, call the Coastguard on 999.

This website is a labour of much love and the content is available for free to everyone. My wonderful readers often ask if there is a way to support my work. You can now ‘buy me a coffee’ through my Ko-fi.uk page. (Just click donate and you can set the amount to pay by PayPal). Thank you!

May Half-Term Rock Pooling

Who doesn’t need a week off at the moment? Whether you’re visiting your local beach or holidaying in Cornwall, rock pooling is a free and fun experience for all the family.

Read on for links to events, rock pooling tips and my guide to what you might find.

Make every beach trip an adventure with my children’s book, Beach Explorer: 50 Things to See and Discover. It’s packed with hands-on activities, facts and quizzes.

EVENTS

Organised rock pooling events are perfect for learning about marine wildlife with the experts. Due to current restrictions, booking is essential for most activities and plans may change. At the time of writing, the following groups and organisations are planning events in the half term:

If you’re not able to attend an event, don’t worry. It’s easy to rock pool safely and to look after the wildlife with a little preparation.

ROCK POOLING TIPS

All you need for successful rock pooling is a pair of wellies or sturdy shoes and a little patience. There are many fascinating species to see, so go slowly, look carefully, leave everything as you found it and have fun!

  • The European 3-spot cowrie (Trivia monacha)
  • St Piran's Hermit Crab at Hannafore, Looe
  • A colourful Xantho pilipes crab.
  • A dahlia anemone.
  • Watching fish at Kynance Cove with Junior (photo by Other Half)
  • Green shore urchin, Hannafore, Looe
  • Passing round a spiny starfish
  • Junior getting to know our wrasse-friend
  • A juvenile turbot at Lundy Bay
  • Cornish Rock Pools junior drying off in the sunshine at Port Nadler, near Looe.
  • Plaidy near Looe
  • Just one more rock... exploring the Cornish rock pools
  • Flat periwinkles and other shells washed up on Looe Beach
  • Montagu's blenny with its distinctive head crest
  • Although painted topshells are a common sight on my local shores, I never tire of photographing them.
  • Always check the tide times, stay clear of cliffs and waves and dress for the weather.
  • Nets can harm delicate sea creatures so are best left at home. A bucket or tub is ideal if you want to scoop up an animal to look at, but be sure to put it back.
  • Why not finish up with a beach clean to help look after the wildlife?

Find out more about rock pooling with my top tips and guides.

BEACHES

The choice is endless! Cornwall has over 300 beaches and they are all fantastic. Any beach with rock pools will have crabs, snails, anemones, fish and more.

Find out about some of my favourite rock pooling beaches here.

WHAT TO SEE

May and June are fabulous rock pooling months. The pools are bursting with new life from baby fish to brightly coloured seaweeds and stunning starfish.

Sit quietly and look closely at the pools to watch prawns, crabs and sea snails going about their business. Gently lift seaweed and look under stones to reveal the secret hiding places underneath (be sure to put them back as you found them).

Here are some of my favourite treasures to find in the pools …

Cushion Stars

These puffy little starfish are common in the pools. Did you know that they can re-grow their arms?

Shannies

The common blenny (or shanny) is perfectly adapted to shore life and can even breathe through its skin when out of the water. It also has a great smile.
The common blenny (or shanny) is perfectly adapted to shore life and can even breathe through its skin when out of the water. It also has a goofy smile.

Sea lemons

In the water the sea lemon's rhinophores and frilly gills emerge and we can see its wonderful colours
Sea lemons a type of sea slug. They eat sponges and breathe through the frilly gills on their backs.

Green Shore Crabs

Green shore crab with eggs - Christmas eve 2018 in Looe
Green shore crabs can survive in lots of different conditions and can eat almost anything – even each other. This female has eggs under her tail.

Common Prawns

Prawns are curious and will often swim over to investigate anything new in their pool. You can see right through their bodies!

Strawberry anemones

Strawberry anemones are red with yellow flecks, just like a strawberry. Their tentacles are packed with stinging cells to catch their prey.

Star Ascidians

Star ascidians might look like flowers but they are simple animals called sea squirts. They form colonies – each ‘petal’ of the flower shapes is an individual animal. They can be yellow, blue, purple, red or white.

Flat Periwinkles

Flat periwinkle in the Cornish rock pools
Flat periwinkles feed on seaweed and come in lots of colours. Look out for their eggs on the seaweed – they look like little circles of jelly.

These are just a few of the creatures you might find. Discover more with my guides to the wildlife in the rock pools and my blog.

Happy rock pooling! Be sure to get in touch to let me know what you find this half-term.

A Year of Cornish Marine Life

Like everything else about 2020, this is a strange New Year’s Eve. Many have lost loved ones this year, and most of us have spent the festive season apart from friends and family. Whatever the year ahead brings, it will be made better by connecting with the natural world and doing the small (or large) things that we can to build a better society and environment.

On the eve of 2021, I am struggling personally to come to terms with losing EU citizenship and all of the opportunity, discovery and connections it has brought me. International cooperation is essential to tackling the global issues that face our wildlife and we will have to work harder than ever to build understanding and find solutions to problems that cannot wait.

Life will go on and I am super-excited about my new children’s book, Beach Explorer, due to be published in the spring. As ever, I will continue to bring you the very best of the Cornish rock pools straight to your computer through my blog.

To bring a little cheer to myself and to you, here are a few of my favourite rock pool wildlife photos from my encounters this year. I hope you will be inspired to get outside and meet your own local wildlife, and to join all of us who are working to protect and restore nature.

A Happy and Healthy New Year to All! Bonne Année 2021!

A painted top shell – January 2020

Xantho pilipes crab – February 2020.
Pagurus cuanensis, the hairy hermit crab. March 2020
Bright coloured sponge (Prob Oscarella sp.) April 2020.
“Cedric the spider crab”. Photo by Cornish Rock Pools Junior. May 2020.
Juvenile masked crab moult. June 2020.
Cladonema radiatum – an athecate hydroid medusa. July 2020.
Calma glaucoides sea slug with its spawn. August 2020.
Star ascidian growing on seaweed. September 2020.
Dahlia anemone. October 2020.
Facelina auriculata – October 2020.
My first ever Xaiva biguttata crab! October 2020.

Migrating Prawns and Blue-Rayed Limpets

Junior normally keeps a low profile on this blog, but for several years now, he has been taking his own photos and videos of marine life. He recently put together this lovely video for Cornwall Wildlife Trust’s Your Shore Beach Rangers project. It showcased alongside other amazing videos by local young people last weekend at the virtual See You at the Sea Festival and he would love to share it with all our Cornish Rock Pools friends.

My favourite part of the video shows something Junior discovered in Looe a couple of months ago: a prawn migration. I was crawling around in waders with my head under a rocky overhang at the time, so I only saw the tail end of the procession as it advanced with the incoming tide. Fortunately, Junior managed to capture some fantastic footage of hundreds of prawns galloping along the seabed, all heading in the same direction in their hunt for food.

Junior’s photo of a common prawn (not migrating!).

Also featured in the video are Junior’s top photographic subjects – the blue-rayed limpet and sea slugs. He’s even coded an animation showing a day in the life of a corkwing wrasse family. We hope you enjoy his work.

Blue-rayed limpets by Cornish Rock Pools Junior

Junior’s friend, Rowen, has also created a video for the festival showing her beautiful marine artwork and how she creates it, all accompanied by incredible facts about the animals she draws and paints. She would love you to take a look.

All of the videos are available to view on the Cornwall Wildlife Trust Marine channel on YouTube. The three with the most likes and views and that catch the judges eye will win prizes this weekend!

I have been writing my new children’s book this year (due to publish spring 2021), but with that nearly ready, I’m looking forward to sharing lots of the fabulous creatures I’ve been seeing in the rock pools over the last few months. Watch this space!

Summer is acome unto day… May Rock Pool Gallery

Summer arrives early in Cornwall, with festivals around the county singing in the new season on the first of May every year.  Except, this year the Padstow Obby Osses have stayed in their stables, the Calstock Giant hasn’t set sail down the Tamar to re-join his love, and there has been none of the usual dancing through the streets of Helston.

Oblivious to all of this, the natural world is carrying on. Swifts are screaming past the window,  the herring gulls are nestled on their mossy rooftop nests and in rockpools everywhere, there will be tangles of new-growing seaweed, father fish guarding their eggs and all manner of colourful creatures going about their usual business.

Scroll through the gallery below for a glimpse of what will be happening right now beneath the waves in rock pools around Cornwall. And if you’d like to find out more about our amazing marine life, explore my blog, or take a look at the fantastic video workshops that Cornwall Wildlife Trust has been busy creating. Happy virtual rockpooling!

  • Our brown Geitodoris planata and its much paler yellow mate getting friendly in the Cornish rock pools!
  • This small species of spider crab (Inachus sp.) was so completely covered in sponges that I couldn't see her shell at all.
  • Another species of stalked jellyfish - Haliclystus octoradiatus - near Penzance
  • Facelina auriculata sea slug
  • Polycera quadrilineata sea slug at Gyllingvase, Falmouth

The Surprising Mini-World of Rock Pool Insects

If my blog posts have seemed a bit thin on the ground the last few months, it’s fair to put the blame on Atiyah, Brendan, Ciara and Dennis.

Even on the good days the lighting and conditions have been less than ideal so, to make the best of a mediocre tide, I enlisted the help of Other Half. Together, we could look under the sort of rock I usually see but leave alone, knowing it weighs far more than I do.

This short video shows you some of the animals living there…. read on to find out more.

Other Half was pleased with the strawberry anemones, which were enormously plump with all their tentacles retracted.

Strawberry anemone
Strawberry anemone

Under a carefully constructed shelter made of small stones and pieces of kelp we could also see the purple-tipped spines of a green shore urchin. Among its many disc-topped tube feet, a long polychaete worm was exploring.

Green shore urchin
Green shore urchin

What drew my eye most, though, were the holes in the rock. These were scattered across the surface of the rock and about the circumference of a pencil. I caught the tiniest glimpse of movement as I looked into one of them.

Piddock holes underneath the boulder.

If I were the BBC Natural History Unit, I’d have filmed inside with an endoscope or transported the rock to deeper water so I could photograph the gaping shells emerging to feed.  Instead, you will have to take my word for it that there were piddocks in those holes!

Piddocks are bivalve molluscs (clam shells), which burrow into the rock and spend their entire lives in their holes.

A rock with this many cracks and holes in it is bound to contain some good hiding places for other animals and also some air pockets, which enable some of our most unlikely rock pool wildlife to survive being submerged twice a day. Some insects and other arthropods that breathe air live here, but you have to be patient to see them.

I settled down with my camera and before long, the first waggling antennae of a springtail poked over the rim.

The end of a piddock protruding from a hole. (Taken on another occasion).

I often see rafts of blue-grey Anurida maritima springtails floating on the surface tension of pools in the summer, but these were smaller still and so pale they looked almost transparent. They are clearly visible in the video but I could only take very blurred still photos.

The fabulous Essential Guide to Rock Pooling by Steve Trewhella and Julie Hatcher was my first port of call in trying to identify them. The book has great photos and plenty of clear information on what to look for. Steve kindly identified these springtails as Axelsonia littorlis – a new species to me. It’s amazing what you find when you stop to look.

The best shots I could get were of a larger bug called Aepophilus bonnairei, a beetle-like creature with red eyes and a spiky coat of hairs around its back and legs. These hairs trap air bubbles, which help the insect to breathe when it is submerged.

Aeopophilus bonnairei bug on a rock
Aepophilus bonnairei bug on a rock
A juvenile Aepophilus bonnarirei.

Time was short as the tide was already turning and the waves were pounding in. I tried to photograph as many species as I could so that I could put records together afterwards. Some, like the painted top shells and the various crabs, are easy to identify.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is between-plaidy-and-millendreath-january-2020-painted-topshell.jpg
Painted top shell.

One of the most striking sponges I see on the shore is the vivid blue Terpios gelatinosus. Many other sponges are harder to identify confidently.

Blue sponge - Terpios gelatinosus with keel worm
Blue sponge – Terpios gelatinosus – with keel worm

It seemed that no part of this valuable habitat was left unoccupied. To avoid any of these creatures coming to harm, we gently manoeuvred the rock back in place well before the surging waves reached us.

Different coloured patches of star ascidian among spirorbid worms, keel worms and other life on the boulder.

As always, I was left in utter awe of the fragile little creatures we saw.

It is remarkable that these animals will cling onto life here no matter how much the wind howls and the sea roars around them, while we head home to bring the plant pots in out of the wind, check the fences and put the kettle on.

Broad-clawed porcelain crab
A grey and windy day on the shore. It’s incredible that anything can survive in these pools, especially insects.

Gem anemone hunt

We weren’t really rock pooling, just going for a walk to the beach, or so we said. Junior packed his hammer and chisel in case there were fossils and I packed my camera, because you never know.

On my last wander at our local beach I had hoped to find some gem anemones to photograph, but didn’t succeed. It was worth another look for these tiny creatures, which have stripy tentacles and bright colours around their mouths when they are open, but at low tide most of them are retracted into white-striped blobs.

When retracted gem anemones look rather like an urchin test with a warty surface and white stripes down their sides.
When retracted ,gem anemones look rather like an urchin test with a warty surface and white stripes down their sides.

I left the sounds of hammering and splitting rocks behind me at the edge of the shore, where Junior was happily amusing himself on a fossil hunt, and headed towards an unseasonably glassy sea, pausing to look for anemones in the small pools on the way.

At the water’s edge, I reached a large pool too deep for gem anemones, but in the middle of the pool a submerged boulder was covered in Irish moss seaweed, providing the perfect habitat for stalked jellyfish. I looked so closely among the tangles of weed, hunting for tiny jellies, that I almost missed the huge stalked jellyfish right under my nose.

Haliclystus octoradiatus stalked jelly near Looe, Cornwall
Haliclystus octoradiatus stalked jelly near Looe, Cornwall

This was an unusually large Haliclystus octoradiatus stalked jellyfish, easily distinguished from the other species we see in Cornwall by the presence of blob-shaped primary tentacles in between its arms.

Most stalked jellyfish of this species have just one primary tentacle blob between each pair of arms, but this one had far more blobs than usual. The jelly can use these primary tentacles as anchors to grip onto the seaweed if it chooses to move, using a looping, cartwheeling motion.

I've sometimes seen a stalked jelly with one extra primary tentacle blob between its arms, but this one had lots of extras.
I’ve sometimes seen a stalked jelly with one extra primary tentacle blob between its arms, but this one had lots of extras.

In another nearby pool I spotted this colourful Calvadosia cruxmelitensis stalked jellyfish, well decorated with white nematocysts, which are its stinging cells.

Calvadosia cruxmelitensis stalked jellyfish
Calvadosia cruxmelitensis stalked jellyfish

Junior joined me at this point, wanting to show me a blenny he’d found. We scrambled nearly to the top of a high rocky outcrop in which some small pools had formed. There was no sign of his little fish, and there were no gem anemones, but there was this daisy anemone.

Daisy anemones have many layered tentacles, like daisy petals and come in all sorts of colours.
Daisy anemones have many layered tentacles, like daisy petals and come in all sorts of colours.

We carried on our expedition through a gap in the rocks to the adjoining beach where clear, shallow pools lined with pink encrusting seaweed nestled under a towering overhang carved out by the sea into the shape of a breaking wave.

Strawberry anemone
Strawberry anemone

These pools were full of anemones too and we stopped to take photos of clusters of snakelocks anemones and a rather flattened-looking strawberry anemone before I noticed the first gem anemone. It was closed up, forming a diminutive pink blob that blended perfectly into the colours of the pool. Close to it was another.

As we moved among the chain of pools we found dozens, but not a single one was open. Junior stared determinedly into every cranny, excited that the pools he had found were proving so interesting.

“There are some open anemones here,” he called out, “maybe Dahlia anemones? What do gem anemones look like when they’re open?”

I knelt on the rock beside him. At the far edge of the pool, tucked under a small ledge, I could see the white stripes of the gem anemone tentacles. Much cheering and hugging ensued.

The open gem anemones Junior found near Looe
The open gem anemones Junior found near Looe

Soon I was able to show Junior my up-close photos of the anemones so he could see why I was so obsessed with finding them. Each one had a vivid, almost fluorescent green mouth tinged with bright pink spots at its corners. The anemone’s mouths were framed in deep red and grey rays that stretched to the base of the zebra striped tentacles, some of which had flashes of green at their bases.

The mouth of the gem anemone
The mouth of the gem anemone

Truly one of our most spectacular anemones, people rarely notice the gem anemone because it is only a few centimetres across even when fully grown.

Gem anemone near Looe, Cornwall
Gem anemone near Looe, Cornwall

Junior is already planning a night time return to these pools to investigate whether these anemones will glow under the light of our ultra-violet torch. Watch this space!

Gem anemone -winter colour in the Cornish rock pools
Gem anemone -winter colour in the Cornish rock pools

Festive Rock Pooling

Tis the season for overspending, overindulgence and over-exhaustion, so what better way to recharge the batteries than some fresh air and rock pool exploration? It’s a family tradition for us this time of year to head in the opposite direction from the shops and to take a breather on the beach.

Christmas cards don’t often depict the traditional Cornish winter weather for good reason. Between the fog and the persistent mizzle, we have to imagine the view through the valley to the beach. Even when we arrive on the shore, we can barely make out the sea, although we can hear it crashing over the rocks and surging up the gullies.

Waves breaking out of the mist at Porth Mear
Waves breaking out of the mist at Porth Mear

The lower shore might be unsafe, but there’s no shortage of colour and variety in the sheltered pools. The rain kindly stops for long enough to let us enjoy our potter through the pools and we have the beach to ourselves.

Other Half finds a large common hermit crab, Pagurus bernhardus, tapping at a shell and we wonder if the crab’s about to move house. Looking closely, the shell it’s interested in is smaller than its own shell and when I look inside there are legs in there. Most likely our hermit is carrying a female around with her until she moults, hoping to mate with her when she does.

Hermit crab holding on to his mate at Porth Mear
Hermit crab holding on to his mate at Porth Mear

The rock pool wildlife couldn’t care less that it’s Christmas, but the bright anemones can’t help but look festive and are all the easier to see now that the seaweeds have died back for the winter.

Snakelocks anemone
Snakelocks anemone

Beadlet anemones at Porth Mear
Beadlet anemones at Porth Mear

Stalked jellyfish are also easier to see on the remaining short crops of Irish moss and red seaweeds in the pools. In a short stretch I find Haliclystus octoradiatus and a beautiful red Calvadosia campanulata stalked jelly.

Haliclystus octoradiatus stalked jellyfish at Porth Mear
Haliclystus octoradiatus stalked jellyfish at Porth Mear

Calvadosia campanulata stalked jelly
Calvadosia campanulata stalked jelly

Another jelly blob catches my eye, just a minute red speck among the seaweed. It seems to be moving, so I focus in with my camera to reveal a baby sea hare grazing its way across a tuft of seaweed. Its red sides seem to be snow-speckled with white and its black-fringed parapodia look like a tiny chimney pot.

Baby sea hare, Aplysia punctata.
Baby sea hare, Aplysia punctata.

In a few months’ time, if it survives the winter, this slug will swell and grow into a fat brown lump many times this size, feeding on the spring growth of seaweed.

Zipping across a shallow pool, a fish smaller than my little finger heads for the shelter of a low rocky ridge where it lies still, relying on its camouflage. The young shanny obligingly sits still for a couple of photos.

A young shanny (Common blenny)
A young shanny (Common blenny)

Soft rain begins to blow into my face as I work my way back over the slippery rocks to rejoin Other Half and Junior, who are entertaining themselves with the noble sport of throwing stones at other stones.

No Christmas stress for us... with the beach to ourselves and an endless supply of stones to throw.
No Christmas stress for us… with the beach to ourselves and an endless supply of stones to throw.

With our wallets intact and our appetites renewed, we’re ready for the feasting to begin.

Wishing you all a very Merry Christmas. Here’s to more rock pooling adventures in 2019!

A Christmas cushion star!
A Christmas cushion star!

 

A summer of snorkels, jellyfish and wrasse

On a summer’s day when the sea and the sky are a matching blue and the whole world sparkles, there’s nothing as inviting as donning a snorkel and taking a swim across the bay. This summer, for the first time, Junior joined me in my forays over the rocky reefs.

While he built up experience, we floated shoulder to shoulder and sculled our way over the waving seaweed to the deeper gullies.

On our third snorkel outing, I was enjoying the sun on my back and the gentle roll of the waves when Junior screamed down his snorkel. I grabbed his arm in case he was hurt, but he was frantically pointing and making the “fish’”sign with his hand. He had just seen his first ballan wrasse.

The fish was a full-sized adult, maybe 40 or 50cm long with a thick body and a criss-cross patterns of lines interspersed with pale blue spots. An impressive fish. Undeterred by Junior’s shriek of excitement, it carried on its slow, hovering path through the kelp-lined gully for a while before darting away as we neared.

Juvenile ballan wrasse can be bright green like this one, but they grow up to around 50cm long when they're mature.
Juvenile ballan wrasse can be bright green like this one, but they grow up to around 50cm long when they’re mature.

On the same venture, we spotted barnacles feeding with their feathery legs, shore crabs strolling along the sea floor, a shanny surveying its territory from the top of a rock and great glistening shoals of sand eels rolling by. On other days, we came across groups of corkwing wrasse with pouting lips and turquoise-striped faces, spider crabs lurching through the kelp, and tangled snakelocks anemones spreading their green tentacles.

Snakelocks anemone
Snakelocks anemone

Nearby, crowds of tourists paddled and swam, oblivious to the beauty below them (or the pinching claws and stinging tentacles near their feet).

This summer has seen waves of jellyfish drifting through, from comb jellies to the harmless moon jelly, the less harmless blue and compass jellies and the enormous barrel jellies. Some days the sea was thick with jellyfish, but this didn’t stop Junior from mastering the art of catching waves on his bodyboard or wiping out headfirst into the blue-jelly-soup. He swam for the shore in a hurry on one of our snorkel safaris though, when a compass jelly brushed over my face and stung my back.

Compass jellies have striking markings and also pack a nettle-like sting
Compass jellies have striking markings and also pack a nettle-like sting

I have almost no photos of our snorkelling expeditions this year. Next year, when Junior is more confident, I’ll be able to carry a camera, but this season we just revelled in the perfect days and soaked up the sun . As we knew it would, the summer ended abruptly, dissipating like a mirage from one day to the next and the water is no longer so inviting.

For now, we are hanging up our snorkels and returning to the rock pools, exchanging beach shoes for wellies as the autumn chill moves in, but there is everything to look forward to. A week of Shoresearch surveys starts tomorrow in Looe, which is guaranteed to bring new finds and lots of species records for Cornwall Wildlife Trust.

The empty beaches make this a wonderful time of year to explore the rock pools and before we know it, the first of the autumn storms will blast in, washing who knows what onto our shores. Watch this space!

Between the snorkel trips, I did squeeze in some rock pooling. Here are some of my favourite photos from the summer.

Xantho hydrophilus crab
Xantho hydrophilus crab

Candy striped flatworm grazing on bryozoans in Looe
Candy striped flatworm grazing on bryozoans in Looe

A variegated scallop with irridescent shining eyes
A variegated scallop with irridescent shining eyes

A green shore urchin with its tentacle feet extended
A green shore urchin with its tentacle feet extended

Doris ocelligera sea slug - I recorded these for the first time a couple of months ago and have found them regularly in the same spot this summer.
Doris ocelligera sea slug – I recorded these for the first time a couple of months ago and have found them regularly in the same spot this summer.

St Piran's hermit crab - now a common find on all our local beaches.
St Piran’s hermit crab – now a common find on all our local beaches.

Summer Holiday Marine and Beach Events in Cornwall

Whether you and the children want to try rock pooling, beach cleans, snorkelling or dolphin watching this summer, you’ll find plenty of fabulous family-friendly events all around Cornwall.

Please check the full details on the organiser’s website, including booking requirements, any charges and age restrictions before attending.

Remember to book well in advance if required.

Have fun!

 

Event Date Time Location Info More details…
Polzeath Rock Pool Ramble 12 July 10.15am – 12.30pm Polzeath BOOKING ESSENTIAL National Trust
Rockpool Expedition and Picnic 14 July 11.30am – 2.00pm Nr Porthcothan BOOKING ESSENTIAL Cornwall Wildlife Trust
Seaweed Search 15 July 12.00 – 2.30pm Prisk Cove, Mawnan Smith Cornwall Wildlife Trust
Durgan Beach Clean 15 July 2.00pm – 4.00pm Bosveal NT Car Park National Trust
Snorkel Safari 15 July 2.00pm – 5.00pm Little Fistral, Newquay CONTACT ORGANISER Newquay Marine Group
Polzeath Rock Pool Ramble 17 July 2.30pm – 4.45pm Polzeath BOOKING ESSENTIAL £2 per person Polzeath Marine Group
Snorkel Safari and Barbecue 17 July 6.00pm – 8.00pm Gyllingvase Beach, Falmouth BOOK TICKETS, Over 9s only. Falmouth Marine Group
Polzeath Beach Clean 18 July 9.30am Polzeath Polzeath Marine Group
Polzeath Marine Crafts 25 July 10.30am – 12.30pm Polzeath Marine Centre £2 per person Polzeath Marine Group
Polzeath Rock Pool Ramble 26 July 10.15am – 12.30pm Polzeath BOOKING ESSENTIAL £2 per person Polzeath Marine Group
Radical Rockpooling 29 July 11.45am – 2.00pm Polzeath BOOKING ESSENTIAL. Over 11s only Cornwall Wildlife Trust
Seaquest Seawatch – watching for dolphins etc. 30 July 11.00am – 1.00pm Lizard Point Cornwall Wildlife Trust
Sunset Session Boat Trip – Wildlife Watching 30 July 6.30pm – 8.30pm Newquay Cornwall Wildife Trust
Seaquest Seawatch – watching for dolphins etc. 31 July 11.00am – 1.00pm St Agnes Head NCI Station Cornwall Wildlife Trust
Polzeath Rock Pool Ramble 31 July 1.15pm – 3.30pm Polzeath BOOKING ESSENTIAL £2 per person Polzeath Marine Group
Paddle for Plastic Kayak Adventure 31 July 2.00pm – 5.00pm Lizard area BOOKING ESSENTIAL. Cornwall residents only. Cornwall Wildlife Trust
Seaquest Seawatch – watching for dolphins etc. 1 Aug 11.00am – 1.00pm Towan Headland, Newquay Cornwall Wildlife Trust
Polzeath Marine Crafts 1 Aug 10.30am – 12.30pm Polzeath Marine Centre £2 per person Polzeath Marine Group
Sandymouth rock pool ramble 1 Aug 1.30pm – 3.00pm Sandymouth  £1 per person. Check booking details with organiser National Trust
Looe Summer Snorkel 1 Aug 4.00pm -6.00pm Hannafore, Looe BOOKING ESSENTIAL. 9-24 year olds only. Cornwall Wildlife Trust
Seaquest Seawatch – watching for dolphins etc. 2 Aug 11.00am – 1.00pm The Rumps, Pentire Headland Cornwall Wildlife Trust
Polzeath Rock Pool Ramble 2 Aug 2.15pm – 4.30pm Polzeath BOOKING ESSENTIAL £2 per person Polzeath Marine Group
Seaquest Seawatch – watching for dolphins etc. 3 Aug 11.00am – 1.00pm Hella Point, Porthgwarra Cornwall Wildlife Trust
Polzeath Beach Clean 3 Aug 9.30am Polzeath Polzeath Marine Group
Rock Pool Explorer 3 Aug 15.00 – 17.00 St Michael’s Mount Check booking requirements with organiser. National Trust
Beach Clean 4 Aug 10.00 – 11.00 Hemmick Beach, Roseland National Trust
Strandline Treasures and Sand Sculpture Competition 4 Aug 1.00pm – 3.00pm Nr Polzeath BOOKING ESSENTIAL Cornwall Wildlife Trust
Seaquest Sunday – watch for dolphins etc 5 Aug 11.00am – 1.00pm Pendennis Head Falmouth Marine Group
Learn to Snorkel in a Rock Pool 6 Aug 3.00pm – 5.00pm Bude BOOKING ESSENTIAL Cornwall Wildlife Trust
Porthcurnick beach clean 6 Aug 10.00am – 11.00am Porthcurnick, Roseland National Trust
Pendower beach clean 6 Aug 2.00pm – 3.30pm Pendower, Roseland National Trust
Marine Litter Masterpieces 7 Aug 10.00am – 12.00 midday Marazion Cornwall Wildlife Trust
Crazy About Crabbing 8 Aug 09.15 – 11.30 Mevagissey Cornwall Wildlife Trust
Polzeath Marine Crafts 8 Aug 10.30am – 12.30pm Polzeath Marine Centre £2 per person Polzeath Marine Group
Seal Squad XP Roadshow Festival 8 Aug and 9 Aug 11.00am – 4.00pm Geevor Tin Mine Included in entry to Geevor Cornwall Wildlife Trust
Polzeath Rock Pool Ramble 9 Aug 9.15am – 11.30 am Polzeath BOOKING ESSENTIAL National Trust
Extreme Rock Pooling 10 Aug 10.00am – 1.00pm Port Isaac BOOKING ESSENTIAL Cornish residents and over 8s only £36 per person Cornwall Wildlife Trust
Rockpool Explorer 10 Aug 10.00am -12.00 midday St Michael’s Mount Check booking requirements with organiser National Trust
Rockpool ramble 10 Aug 10.45am – 12.45am Readymoney Cove, Fowey £1.50 for non-members of Friends of Fowey Estuary Cornwall Wildlife Trust
Night time rock pooling 10 Aug 9.00pm – 11.00pm Gyllingvase, Falmouth BOOKING ESSENTIAL Falmouth Marine Group
Porth Beach Clean 11 Aug 10.00am – 1.00pm Porth, Newquay Newquay Marine Group
Rockpool Ramble 12 Aug 11.30am – 1.30pm Porthlevan BOOKING ESSENTIAL, Over 6s only Cornwall Wildlife Trust
An introduction to the rock pools 12 Aug 11.00am – 1.00pm Hannafore, Looe BOOKING ESSENTIAL Cornwall Wildlife Trust

wildlifewatch@cornwallwildlifetrust.org.uk

National Marine Week Summer Holiday Rockpool Ramble 12 Aug 12.30pm – 2.00pm Hannafore Looe Looe Marine Conservation Group
Polzeath Rock Pool Ramble 12 Aug 11.45am – 2.00pm Polzeath BOOKING ESSENTIAL £2 per person Polzeath Marine Group
Newquay Summer Snorkel 12 Aug 2.00pm – 4.00pm Little Fistral, Newquay Check booking arrangements with organiser. 11+ only Cornwall Wildlife Trust
Polzeath Rock Pool Ramble 14 Aug 1.15pm – 3.30pm Polzeath BOOKING ESSENTIAL £2 per person Polzeath Marine Group
Polzeath Marine Crafts 15 Aug 10.30am – 12.30pm Polzeath Marine Centre £2 per person Polzeath Marine Group
Sandymouth Summer Rock Pool Ramble 15 Aug 1.00pm – 3.00pm Sandymouth  £1 per person. Check details with organiser National Trust
Polzeath Rock Pool Ramble 16 Aug 2.30pm – 4.45pm Polzeath BOOKING ESSENTIAL £2 per person Polzeath Marine Group
Rockpool Explorer 17 Aug 3.00pm – 5.00pm St Michael’s Mount Check booking arrangements with organiser National Trust
Sunset Beach Clean 18 Aug 7.00pm – 8.00pm Harlyn Bay
Rockpool Explorer 17 Aug 3.00pm – 5.00pm St Michael’s Mount Check booking arrangements with organiser National Trust
Fowey Marine Day 21 Aug 10.00am – 2.00pm Town Quay, Fowey Cornwall Wildlife Trust
Summer Sunset Beach Clean 21 Aug 7.00pm -8.00pm Trevone Bay Beach Guardian
Polzeath Marine Crafts 22 Aug 10.30am – 12.30pm Polzeath Marine Centre £2 per person Polzeath Marine Group
Rock Pool Explorer 24 Aug 10.00am – 12.00 midday St Michael’s Mount Check booking arrangements with organiser National Trust
Polzeath Rockpool Ramble 24 Aug 10.15am – 12.30pm Polzeath BOOKING ESSENTIAL National Trust
Polzeath Marine Crafts 29 Aug 10.30am – 12.30pm Polzeath Marine Centre £2 per person Polzeath Marine Group
Summer Rock Pool Ramble at Sandymouth 29 Aug 1.00pm – 3.00pm Sandymouth  £1 per person. Check booking details with organiser National Trust
Rockpool ramble 30 Aug 1.30pm – 3.30pm Nr. Mawnan Smith BOOKING ESSENTIAL Cornwall Wildlife Trust
Polzeath Rock Pool Ramble 31 Aug 1.45pm – 4.00pm Polzeath BOOKING ESSENTIAL £2 per person Polzeath Marine Group
Rockpool Explorer 31 Aug 3.00pm – 5.00pm St Michael’s Mount Check booking arrangements with organiser National Trust
Hemmick beach clean 1 Sep 10.00am – 11.00am Hemmick beach, Roseland National Trust
Seaquest Sunday – Looking for dolphins etc. 2 Sep 11.00am – 1.00pm Pendennis Head, Falmouth Falmouth Marine Group
Porthcurnick beach clean 3 Sep 10.00 – 11.00 Porthcurnick beach, Roseland National Trust
Pendower beach 3 Sep 2.00pm – 3.30pm Pendower beach, Roseland National Trust

If you know of any other summer beach events in Cornwall this summer, let me know and I’ll add them to the list.