Tag Archives: coral

Citizen Science in action with Shoresearch

Every year, the Cornwall Wildlife Trust’s Shoresearch project undertakes the ultimate rockpooling challenge with a week of beach surveys. I’d love to survey all five locations, but Junior has other plans, including a midnight rockpooling session. Watching hermit crabs bombing about the pools at 1am is great fun, but isn’t conducive to being the other side of the county bright and early.

Night-pooling at Hannafore. Many rock pool animals are more active at night.
Night-pooling at Hannafore. Many rock pool animals are more active at night.

We catch up with the indefatigable Matt and Adele from the Cornwall Wildlife Trust on days three and four of their Shoresearch survey marathon. Together with a team of enthusiastic volunteers, we complete a randomised quadrant transect and a general search at Readymoney Cove in Fowey and Hannafore beach in Looe.

Shoresearch crew in action at Readymoney
Shoresearch crew in action at Readymoney

It’s lovely to hang out with like-minded people and whether you’re experienced or completely new to rockpooling, there are always new things to find and learn by exploring the shore in a group.

At Readymoney Cove, we soon discover that there are lots of Common starfish about. These are the classic orange five-armed sea stars that are always represented on children’s seaside books, but are more common in deeper water than on the shore.

Common starfish are less common on the shore than Spiny starfish and Cushion stars.
Common starfish are less common on the shore than Spiny starfish and Cushion stars.

In fact, it’s an echinoderm-rich sort of day, with loads of representatives of this family of animals on the shore. There’s a whole collection of echinoderms together on one rock: a green shore urchin; sea gherkin (a type of sea cucumber); brittle stars and cushion stars.

Sea gherkin - these small sea cucumbers are often found on rocks on the shore. They're related to starfish and urchins.
Sea gherkin – these small sea cucumbers are often found on rocks on the shore. They’re related to starfish and urchins.
A spiny starfish
A spiny starfish

It feels like interrupting a family meeting so I replace the stone and leave them to it.

Later in the day we find another echinoderm, the Kaleidoscope starfish (Asterina phylactica) which is very small and lives among the pink coral weeds in sheltered pools. Its back is covered in colourful circles of orange and white, forming a dark star in its centre. The dots are made by the little pincers (pedicillerae) which the starfish uses to keep its back clean, as you can see in the photo.

Asterina phylactica - the kaleidoscope starfish in a rock pool at Readymoney, Fowey.
Asterina phylactica – the kaleidoscope starfish in a rock pool at Readymoney, Fowey.

Other great finds were numerous Devonshire cup corals.

Devonshire cup coral at Readymoney. This species has a squashed oval shape to the cup and is a pale creamy-yellow colour.
Devonshire cup coral at Readymoney. This species has a squashed oval shape to the cup and is a pale creamy-yellow colour.

When these are underwater they extend their translucent tentacles, but on the shore you tend to only see the calcerous cup shapes.

There were several Devonshire cup corals in this dark overhang
There are several Devonshire cup corals in this dark overhang
This coral was submerged and you can just see some of its tentacles coming out at the bottom. As is often the case it was in an awkward position so I couldn't see to focus!
This coral is submerged and you can just see some of its tentacles coming out at the bottom. As is often the case it is in an awkward position so I can’t focus!

There are several Calvadosia campanulata stalked jellyfish in the pools. They seem to grow large this time of year and are easier to spot as the seaweed begins to die back.

Trying to take a photo of a Calvadosia campanulata stalked jelly, but being photo-bombed by a common prawn!
Trying to take a photo of a Calvadosia campanulata stalked jelly, but being photo-bombed by a common prawn!

After a lot of looking, I finally turn up some sea slugs too. There are several Sea lemons under one rock and next to a coil of spawn I also find a Jorunna tomentosa slug.

Jorunna tomentosa sea slug
Jorunna tomentosa sea slug

On the next day we survey Hannafore, which has a vast are of rocky shore. We spread out looking for interesting creatures and have no problem finding them.

The bizarre-looking echiuran worm Thalassema thalassemum
The bizarre-looking echiuran worm Thalassema thalassemum
Exterminate! Junior loved the shape of this Lamellaria perspicua mollusc - the hollow syphon does look like a gun!
Exterminate! Junior loves the shape of this Lamellaria perspicua mollusc – the hollow syphon does look like a gun!

We spend a lot of time failing to re-find the very rare Lucernaria quadricornis stalked jellyfish which was recorded on this beach a few months back. We do, however, find many other fabulous creatures while we are looking.

Close-up of a Sea lemon sea slug
Close-up of a Sea lemon sea slug
An interesting creature congregation: A Scyon ciliatum sponge (left) and a Candelabrum cocksii (right), which is a hyrozoan animal related to jellyfish and anemones.
An interesting creature congregation: A Scyon ciliatum sponge (left) and a Candelabrum cocksii (right), which is a hyrozoan animal related to jellyfish and anemones.

Junior and I decide to leave a bit early as he’s been wading in deep water and is completely sodden, so we miss the find of the day, a Giant goby.

Shoresearch has been going for a good few years now and is a perfect opportunity to learn about wildlife, contribute to conservation and connect with others. I’m hoping I’ll get to do all five days of Shoresearch Week next year as well as other surveys and events during the year. Perhaps I’ll see you there?

In the meantime here are some more of the week’s finds…

A tortoiseshell limpet (Tectura virginea) living on kelp, Hannafore
A tortoiseshell limpet (Tectura virginea) living on kelp, Hannafore
Tethya aurantium - a 'golf ball' sponge at Hannafore
Tethya aurantium – a ‘golf ball’ sponge at Hannafore
A white Painted top shell (Calliostoma zizyphinum) - usually pink
A white Painted top shell (Calliostoma zizyphinum) – usually pink
Scorpion fish (Taurulus bubalis) - the white barbel at the corner of the mouth is a good way to identify this species.
Scorpion fish (Taurulus bubalis) – the white barbel at the corner of the mouth is a good way to identify this species.

A Window to the Underwater World

The pools sparkle as the sun finally shoulders its way through the February murk. Beneath the surface, the seaweeds are sprouting up, the first sign of spring in the rock pools, and with them come the sea slugs. Many of these minute molluscs choose to spawn in the shallow waters around the shore, where their favourite foods such as sponges, sea squirts and seaweeds are abundant.

A baby sea hare, Aplysia punctata, grazing on seaweed.
A baby sea hare, Aplysia punctata, grazing on seaweed.

How they travel such distances to find mates and lay their eggs here is something of a mystery to me. They are delicate, squishy little things at best, and mere blobs of jelly out of the water. Once in the water, though, they reveal their colours and shapes, and most rockpoolers delight in finding them. Today, I see mostly pale, blobby ones rather than their spectacular cousins, but they are intriguing nonetheless. Continue reading A Window to the Underwater World

Cornish Rock Pools on Tour – Trévignon, Brittany

If Cornwall has a cousin, it must be Brittany. The family traits are unmistakeable in the culture, language and, of course, the rock pools, so it seems inevitable that I am drawn to the high headlands, sweeping dunes and granite boulders of the Cornouailles region. With the sun bouncing off the multi-coloured fishing boats behind the harbour wall at Trévignon and the tide dropping, I wander under the towering man-made supports of the lifeboat slipway and nearly drop my camera in excitement.

Oysters at Trevignon, Brittany.
Oysters. Pacific oyster on right.

There are oysters clinging to the seawards side, oodles of them and they’re nearly all the native species, now rare at home due to overfishing and the invasion of the Pacific oyster. Not only that, but among them, reaching out like flowers towards the light are pale pink Devonshire cup corals. At home, I see these occasionally at the back of dark wave-battered overhangs, but these are in the open so I can get in close and marvel at every spoke of their delicate wheel-like markings. It’s a magical moment and I long for a camera with a macro strong enough to capture them. Continue reading Cornish Rock Pools on Tour – Trévignon, Brittany